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Tourism and Water: Protecting our Common Future

Written by CBC NEWS

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The Barbados-based Caribbean Tourism Organization is urging regional governments to introduce various policies, including legislation and tax rebates, so as to ensure the survival of the tourism industry.

In a message marking World Tourism Day on Friday, CTO chairperson, Beverly Nicholson-Doty, said there was need for a “multi-sectorial approach – combining public policy and incentives; private-sector financing and endorsement; backed by effective community and visitor education and awareness programmes” to ensure the sustainability of the industry.

World Tourism Day is being held under the theme “Tourism and Water: Protecting our Common Future” and Nicholson-Doty said that the occasion provides an opportunity for the region “to reflect on all aspects of our vital tourism sector – the social, cultural, economic and environmental aspects – and the impact they have on our precious water resources.

“Water is such a natural part of the Caribbean, with a seemingly endless supply of both fresh and sea water, that we risk taking it for granted.”

She described the tourism sector as the region’s main economic earner relying “heavily on reliable sources of water so we should find ways to ensure sustainable supply to our hotels, restaurants, entertainment centres, and sporting facilities. Visiting cruise ships also need this precious resource to function effectively.

Meanwhile the Hon. Richard Sealy, Barbados Minister of Tourism and International Transport said, “The tourism industry is very important to Barbados for several reasons. It is the main economic activity and source of employment and also acts as a major catalyst in promoting infrastructural development, socio-cultural awareness and an appreciation of the need to take care of and maintain the environment.

He stressed how the success is connected. “Successful implementation of a sustainable and responsible tourism industry will also hinge upon the development of strong public-private sector partnerships. If managed sustainably, tourism can bring benefits to the national and local communities and support water preservation,” Sealy said

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Written by CBC NEWS

Adapted

The Barbados-based Caribbean Tourism Organization is urging regional governments to introduce various policies, including legislation and tax rebates, so as to ensure the survival of the tourism industry.

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In a message marking World Tourism Day on Friday, CTO chairperson, Beverly Nicholson-Doty, said there was need for a “multi-sectorial approach – combining public policy and incentives; private-sector financing and endorsement; backed by effective community and visitor education and awareness programmes” to ensure the sustainability of the industry.

World Tourism Day is being held under the theme “Tourism and Water: Protecting our Common Future” and Nicholson-Doty said that the occasion provides an opportunity for the region “to reflect on all aspects of our vital tourism sector – the social, cultural, economic and environmental aspects – and the impact they have on our precious water resources.

“Water is such a natural part of the Caribbean, with a seemingly endless supply of both fresh and sea water, that we risk taking it for granted.”

She described the tourism sector as the region’s main economic earner relying “heavily on reliable sources of water so we should find ways to ensure sustainable supply to our hotels, restaurants, entertainment centres, and sporting facilities. Visiting cruise ships also need this precious resource to function effectively.

Meanwhile the Hon. Richard Sealy, Barbados Minister of Tourism and International Transport said, “The tourism industry is very important to Barbados for several reasons. It is the main economic activity and source of employment and also acts as a major catalyst in promoting infrastructural development, socio-cultural awareness and an appreciation of the need to take care of and maintain the environment.

He stressed how the success is connected. “Successful implementation of a sustainable and responsible tourism industry will also hinge upon the development of strong public-private sector partnerships. If managed sustainably, tourism can bring benefits to the national and local communities and support water preservation,” Sealy said