Categorized | Local, Opinions, Politics

The Value of An Internship

by Keima Allen
Montserratian: Writing from London, England

There has been an alleged rift between British Prime Minister, David Cameron and the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg on whether family and friends should aid with awarding an internship.

The Prime Minister David Cameron sees nothing wrong with assisting in getting that first job or training. Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg however seems to think this is a form of nepotism and that people with better connections does nothing to aid social mobility. Clegg encourages companies to be more transparent and meritocratic when awarding internships.

Both leaders have openly admitted they have had a ‘leg – up’ on the career ladder thanks to an internship recommended by a friend or relative. Clegg has been criticised over this hypocrisy as he benefited from an internship given to him with the assistance of his father in a Finish Bank.

It begs the questions as to how easy it is for one to get that all important internship particularly coming from a working class background. It is well documented that applying for internships in fields such as politics, law and medicine are hugely competitive. More-so usually its those with better grades and from better social standings that has a higher percentage chance of receiving an internship.

Furthermore even getting an internship means in most cases working for free or on very low wages. Recently the coalition government increased interns pay to two pounds sixty pence an hour. This is drastically low wages and possible would not amount to enough to cover the cost of travel fare in London.

It leads one to think that perhaps PM David Cameron is right that the connections we all have around us may be an alternative solution. Not only that but schools and universities should provide value for money and be more proactive in setting up some internship programmes. Schools and universities should be working more closely with businesses to support young people, with getting that ‘leg-up’ the career ladder.

Leave a Reply

TMR print pages

Newsletter

Archives

CARICOM – Staff Vacancy

CXC HEADQUARTERS - Executive Search

https://indd.adobe.com/embed/2b4deb22-cf03-4509-9bbd-938c7e8ecc7d

A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

by Keima Allen
Montserratian: Writing from London, England

There has been an alleged rift between British Prime Minister, David Cameron and the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg on whether family and friends should aid with awarding an internship.

The Prime Minister David Cameron sees nothing wrong with assisting in getting that first job or training. Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg however seems to think this is a form of nepotism and that people with better connections does nothing to aid social mobility. Clegg encourages companies to be more transparent and meritocratic when awarding internships.

Insert Ads Here

Both leaders have openly admitted they have had a ‘leg – up’ on the career ladder thanks to an internship recommended by a friend or relative. Clegg has been criticised over this hypocrisy as he benefited from an internship given to him with the assistance of his father in a Finish Bank.

It begs the questions as to how easy it is for one to get that all important internship particularly coming from a working class background. It is well documented that applying for internships in fields such as politics, law and medicine are hugely competitive. More-so usually its those with better grades and from better social standings that has a higher percentage chance of receiving an internship.

Furthermore even getting an internship means in most cases working for free or on very low wages. Recently the coalition government increased interns pay to two pounds sixty pence an hour. This is drastically low wages and possible would not amount to enough to cover the cost of travel fare in London.

It leads one to think that perhaps PM David Cameron is right that the connections we all have around us may be an alternative solution. Not only that but schools and universities should provide value for money and be more proactive in setting up some internship programmes. Schools and universities should be working more closely with businesses to support young people, with getting that ‘leg-up’ the career ladder.