Categorized | Editorial, News

The motion debate has shown up some known backward traits

Editorial – July 6, 2012

The recent “No Confidence Motion” that was tabled and debated against Premier R T Meade primarily, and his government, gave the Ministers and back benchers (Parliamentary Secretaries) a great opportunity to get for the benefit of Montserrat a more cohesive, progressive, confident and educated leaders. But, on even the shallowest depth of thoughts will show it succeeded in entrenching the self-preservation we hoped they would not seek.

Way back, in 1992 and 20 years later Montserrat politicians are still being asked to be honest and show integrity.

The Premier in his address as he defended “one manism” leadership, asked for time to continue for the full five-year term. “…but we’ve delivered sufficient to allow us the opportunity to continue serving out our term until the next elections…” he said, then apologising for his short comings, but only on the tariff, as he accepted full ‘official’ responsibility.

As the Premier sought to defend his admittedly condemned and wasted recommendation to the Decolonisation Committee, he claimed that it was his personal style and position on the matter. He claimed he knew that only the people could ask for that position in particular circumstances. Why claim the UK government support? Two weeks later, they confounded him in a White Paper that will remain in history compounding what everyone condemned him for, except his Ministers and blinders.

Did he really try to give the impression that he represented his personal view? That is inordinately indecent. When he spoke, he did so using the Montserrat People – we, our etc., falsely claiming that, “we are fully internally self-governing.” His other supporting arguments or claims would not stand scant scrutiny.

The three opposition members and the other five elected members of government privately did not know anything, or at best very little about the tariff, other than what the Premier told them in cabinet, but on the UN speech, they were all taken completely by surprise. One only had to listen to the Premier talk carelessly, no longer the effective speaker he was, tell the public via ZJB Radio Basil Chambers morning program, that no one in Montserrat new anything about the UN Decolonisation Committee before it was made an issue after his speech. That really carelessly said or otherwise was a shameful admission and confounded him to one manism.

When the motion was debated, those who have otherwise said that the tariff law should be recalled, cancelled, should have made that position clear. Instead they listened over and over to the Minister of Finance (Premier) say the exercise will be relooked.

As of today, Friday, nothing has been done about it. Instead Cabinet has reportedly, based on utterances by Ministers in support of the Premier, approved the installation of a cigarette or tobacco factory, which products are internationally known and accepted, kill people.

The Cigarette factory

The question again; why should Montserrat be producing products, which are known to kill thousands of people each year.

There is no developmental project that can take place in Montserrat these days that can take place or approved before environmental and other impact assessments and studies are carried out. These include economic assessments. Those authority with the responsibility of carrying out such economic assessments have found that the project will bring no economic benefit to Montserrat. In fact, the only benefit claimed is that 15 jobs will be created. Good! Who will get these jobs? The principals of the company are Spanish, so we are informed. And, the reason that the Premier has ruled that this project will go forward, irrespective, there are already some high paying salaries being boasted about.

Did our government take on board World Health Organisation (WHO) conventions to which Montserrat is a party the many recommendations to consider when dealing with the tobacco industry? Such as: “Do not give preferential treatment to the tobacco industry.” We learnt that an important committee in government on at least two occasions failed to give the green light to this company as not being economically viable to Montserrat.

Did the failure involve this recommendation? “ equire that information provided by the tobacco industry be transparent and accurate.

With regards to the tariff, an in-depth look will show that some items were definitely targeted. Investigations again reveal that direct instructions were given, with the brush aside over the effect of other items in general. The public servants who made these observations must be commended and not victimized as has been done in other situations recently.

The Governor may well soon be challenged that while they are working on a new Public Service Act, it must be what he promises it to be. One that encourages decent behavior all round and from all public servants including those elected. They must expect to be accountable and responsible, but they must also expect protection in doing so.

 

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Editorial – July 6, 2012

The recent “No Confidence Motion” that was tabled and debated against Premier R T Meade primarily, and his government, gave the Ministers and back benchers (Parliamentary Secretaries) a great opportunity to get for the benefit of Montserrat a more cohesive, progressive, confident and educated leaders. But, on even the shallowest depth of thoughts will show it succeeded in entrenching the self-preservation we hoped they would not seek.

Way back, in 1992 and 20 years later Montserrat politicians are still being asked to be honest and show integrity.

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The Premier in his address as he defended “one manism” leadership, asked for time to continue for the full five-year term. “…but we’ve delivered sufficient to allow us the opportunity to continue serving out our term until the next elections…” he said, then apologising for his short comings, but only on the tariff, as he accepted full ‘official’ responsibility.

As the Premier sought to defend his admittedly condemned and wasted recommendation to the Decolonisation Committee, he claimed that it was his personal style and position on the matter. He claimed he knew that only the people could ask for that position in particular circumstances. Why claim the UK government support? Two weeks later, they confounded him in a White Paper that will remain in history compounding what everyone condemned him for, except his Ministers and blinders.

Did he really try to give the impression that he represented his personal view? That is inordinately indecent. When he spoke, he did so using the Montserrat People – we, our etc., falsely claiming that, “we are fully internally self-governing.” His other supporting arguments or claims would not stand scant scrutiny.

The three opposition members and the other five elected members of government privately did not know anything, or at best very little about the tariff, other than what the Premier told them in cabinet, but on the UN speech, they were all taken completely by surprise. One only had to listen to the Premier talk carelessly, no longer the effective speaker he was, tell the public via ZJB Radio Basil Chambers morning program, that no one in Montserrat new anything about the UN Decolonisation Committee before it was made an issue after his speech. That really carelessly said or otherwise was a shameful admission and confounded him to one manism.

When the motion was debated, those who have otherwise said that the tariff law should be recalled, cancelled, should have made that position clear. Instead they listened over and over to the Minister of Finance (Premier) say the exercise will be relooked.

As of today, Friday, nothing has been done about it. Instead Cabinet has reportedly, based on utterances by Ministers in support of the Premier, approved the installation of a cigarette or tobacco factory, which products are internationally known and accepted, kill people.

The Cigarette factory

The question again; why should Montserrat be producing products, which are known to kill thousands of people each year.

There is no developmental project that can take place in Montserrat these days that can take place or approved before environmental and other impact assessments and studies are carried out. These include economic assessments. Those authority with the responsibility of carrying out such economic assessments have found that the project will bring no economic benefit to Montserrat. In fact, the only benefit claimed is that 15 jobs will be created. Good! Who will get these jobs? The principals of the company are Spanish, so we are informed. And, the reason that the Premier has ruled that this project will go forward, irrespective, there are already some high paying salaries being boasted about.

Did our government take on board World Health Organisation (WHO) conventions to which Montserrat is a party the many recommendations to consider when dealing with the tobacco industry? Such as: “Do not give preferential treatment to the tobacco industry.” We learnt that an important committee in government on at least two occasions failed to give the green light to this company as not being economically viable to Montserrat.

Did the failure involve this recommendation? “ equire that information provided by the tobacco industry be transparent and accurate.

With regards to the tariff, an in-depth look will show that some items were definitely targeted. Investigations again reveal that direct instructions were given, with the brush aside over the effect of other items in general. The public servants who made these observations must be commended and not victimized as has been done in other situations recently.

The Governor may well soon be challenged that while they are working on a new Public Service Act, it must be what he promises it to be. One that encourages decent behavior all round and from all public servants including those elected. They must expect to be accountable and responsible, but they must also expect protection in doing so.