Categorized | Regional

Stanford`s Sticky Wicket Reopens In Antigua

Stanford's Sticky Wicket next to VC Bird Int. Airport

Sticky Wicket, the cricket themed restaurant once owned by former billionaire R. Allen Stanford, has reopened its doors in Antigua.

The restaurant along with a cricket stadium has been reopened with investment from local investors, reports indicate. Both belonged to accused Ponzi schemer and jailed Texas financier Stanford.

The restaurant was located near to the airport, allowing travelers to dine between flights. Antiguan soccer officials say the cricket stadium will also serve as home to the Barracuda Football Club, its first professional soccer team and at least 15 games are scheduled there starting in April 2011.

Stanford's Sticky Wicket - first stop from airport, after parking lot

Stanford was once the largest private employer in Antigua with 800 workers. He has pleaded not guilty to running a US$7 billion Ponzi scheme and to charges including money laundering and wire fraud.

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Stanford's Sticky Wicket next to VC Bird Int. Airport

Sticky Wicket, the cricket themed restaurant once owned by former billionaire R. Allen Stanford, has reopened its doors in Antigua.

The restaurant along with a cricket stadium has been reopened with investment from local investors, reports indicate. Both belonged to accused Ponzi schemer and jailed Texas financier Stanford.

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The restaurant was located near to the airport, allowing travelers to dine between flights. Antiguan soccer officials say the cricket stadium will also serve as home to the Barracuda Football Club, its first professional soccer team and at least 15 games are scheduled there starting in April 2011.

Stanford's Sticky Wicket - first stop from airport, after parking lot

Stanford was once the largest private employer in Antigua with 800 workers. He has pleaded not guilty to running a US$7 billion Ponzi scheme and to charges including money laundering and wire fraud.