Categorized | Editorial, News

So what is this Good Governance –Sustainable Human Development?

Editorial – July 5, 2013

We are still on the issue of Good Governance, because we believe at the juncture that Montserrat finds itself, not just our leaders and public servants must understand this to the best of their ability, but the people they lead and serve must also know what characteristics and by what the attitudes they are governed and wished to be governed.

Several have seen the elements of good governance we published two weeks in a row, which we did unintentionally the second time, but in the end we believe that it portrayed perhaps much more simply than we could have done ourselves.

Here are some explanations, and we begin with a description and cover for the explanations that we present. We hope that any conclusions should show a clear picture, that good governance is an ideal which is difficult to achieve in its totality. Very few countries and societies have come close to achieving good governance in its totality. However, to ensure sustainable human development, actions must be taken to work towards this ideal with the aim of making it a reality.

This is so because it is how men (human beings) have turned out to be. Please do not get philosophical and cause the discussion to stray.

We believe that simple goodness, whether spiritually, morally or otherwise, just goodness, will help to us to understand that some honesty, all a part of goodness will show us:

Transparency: That’s when decisions taken and their enforcement are done in a manner that follows rules and regulations. It also means that information is freely available and directly accessible to those who will be affected by such decisions and their enforcement. It also means that enough information is provided and that it is provided in easily understandable forms and media. (If you were listening to the debates in the last Legislative Assembly you would have heard the Premier refer to following rules and laws.)

Responsiveness: Good governance requires that institutions and processes try to serve all stakeholders within a reasonable timeframe. (You would have read in these columns how public servants declare they do not understand or do not care to do anything for the benefit of the private sector (the rest)).

Consensus oriented: There are several actors and as many view points in a given society. Good governance requires mediation of the different interests in society to reach a broad consensus in society on what is in the best interest of the whole community and how this can be achieved. It also requires a broad and long-term perspective on what is needed for sustainable human development and how to achieve the goals of such development. This can only result from an understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts of a given society or community. (Why don’t we really publish and discuss further the discussions on our culture, and in particular try to go back and take some time to discuss where we have come since 1989 and in particular, since 1996 and again from 2001. Yes get a concensus and include those of the Diaspora who left and were glad they did, those who have no idea, and those who believe they are worse off).

Equity and inclusiveness: A society’s well being depends on ensuring that all its members feel that they have a stake in it and do not feel excluded from the mainstream of society. This requires all groups, but particularly the most vulnerable, have opportunities to improve or maintain their well being. (Any attempt at what is mentioned in Consensus above lead naturally to this, we have a serious short-coming in this area. Ah yes, but discussions are shelved.)

Next week we will conclude. There are still to come Effectiveness and efficiency, Accountability, Rule of law and Participation. Yet there is more it is hardly exhaustive and the arguments are many.

 

 

 

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Editorial – July 5, 2013

We are still on the issue of Good Governance, because we believe at the juncture that Montserrat finds itself, not just our leaders and public servants must understand this to the best of their ability, but the people they lead and serve must also know what characteristics and by what the attitudes they are governed and wished to be governed.

Several have seen the elements of good governance we published two weeks in a row, which we did unintentionally the second time, but in the end we believe that it portrayed perhaps much more simply than we could have done ourselves.

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Here are some explanations, and we begin with a description and cover for the explanations that we present. We hope that any conclusions should show a clear picture, that good governance is an ideal which is difficult to achieve in its totality. Very few countries and societies have come close to achieving good governance in its totality. However, to ensure sustainable human development, actions must be taken to work towards this ideal with the aim of making it a reality.

This is so because it is how men (human beings) have turned out to be. Please do not get philosophical and cause the discussion to stray.

We believe that simple goodness, whether spiritually, morally or otherwise, just goodness, will help to us to understand that some honesty, all a part of goodness will show us:

Transparency: That’s when decisions taken and their enforcement are done in a manner that follows rules and regulations. It also means that information is freely available and directly accessible to those who will be affected by such decisions and their enforcement. It also means that enough information is provided and that it is provided in easily understandable forms and media. (If you were listening to the debates in the last Legislative Assembly you would have heard the Premier refer to following rules and laws.)

Responsiveness: Good governance requires that institutions and processes try to serve all stakeholders within a reasonable timeframe. (You would have read in these columns how public servants declare they do not understand or do not care to do anything for the benefit of the private sector (the rest)).

Consensus oriented: There are several actors and as many view points in a given society. Good governance requires mediation of the different interests in society to reach a broad consensus in society on what is in the best interest of the whole community and how this can be achieved. It also requires a broad and long-term perspective on what is needed for sustainable human development and how to achieve the goals of such development. This can only result from an understanding of the historical, cultural and social contexts of a given society or community. (Why don’t we really publish and discuss further the discussions on our culture, and in particular try to go back and take some time to discuss where we have come since 1989 and in particular, since 1996 and again from 2001. Yes get a concensus and include those of the Diaspora who left and were glad they did, those who have no idea, and those who believe they are worse off).

Equity and inclusiveness: A society’s well being depends on ensuring that all its members feel that they have a stake in it and do not feel excluded from the mainstream of society. This requires all groups, but particularly the most vulnerable, have opportunities to improve or maintain their well being. (Any attempt at what is mentioned in Consensus above lead naturally to this, we have a serious short-coming in this area. Ah yes, but discussions are shelved.)

Next week we will conclude. There are still to come Effectiveness and efficiency, Accountability, Rule of law and Participation. Yet there is more it is hardly exhaustive and the arguments are many.