Categorized | Local, Regional

Second civil service strike

Smaller numbers of civil servants turned out this week to support the strike called by the Civil Service Association

Civil Servants in the Turks and Caicos Islands continued striking for the second straight day on Tuesday November 29th, and there are indications that they are refusing to back down unless the Interim Government meets their demands.

“The strike is on until we are satisfied that progress on our issues is being made in a timely manner,” said Dr. Rufus Ewing, President of the Civil Servants Association. “We encourage all civil servants to stand up for their rights and continue to fight for justice.”

Meantime, CSA President Dr. Ewing, who is also Director of Medical Service, said the CSA will “not allow anyone to destroy our vision and together we will stand to fight for our rights as civil servants and as Turks and Caicos islanders”.

Monday was the first day of a planned two-day strike of public servants in both Providenciales and Grand Turk.

People passing the protest location in front of the Provo Sam’s Downtown building, which houses the immigration department, could count no more than 15 individuals demonstrating, including head of the Civil Service Association (CSA), Dr Rufus Ewing, who was at the microphone attempting to explain the strikers’ goals. The remarks of the former medical director, who himself is on paid leave, did not seem to take issue with looming layoffs but were directed to the size of the severance package for those furloughed.

In Grand Turk, a motorcade of approximately 15 vehicles paraded before government facilities and later approximately 25 strikers and/or supporters were also on the mike urging strikers to join them. Disappointment in the turnout was spoken to by one speaker who claimed she was being encouraged by friends in the Bahamas. One demonstrator not in the designated red garb seemed to taunt new leader of the Peoples Democratic Movement (PDM), Derek Taylor, to come out and join them. Taylor resides in Grand Turk.

While Ewing warned this second strike would be joined by triple the numbers of last week’s strike, the turnout appeared to lose about 90 percent of last week’s support.

PTV, which covered the event, spoke about the disappointing turnout.

Also taking to the TV airwaves, government CEO Martin Stanley expressed support for the people’s right to strike and demonstrate for specific issues. Stanley said that last week’s strikers were more violent and were joined by non-civil servants. Last week’s Provo demonstration included numerous youngsters.

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Smaller numbers of civil servants turned out this week to support the strike called by the Civil Service Association

Civil Servants in the Turks and Caicos Islands continued striking for the second straight day on Tuesday November 29th, and there are indications that they are refusing to back down unless the Interim Government meets their demands.

“The strike is on until we are satisfied that progress on our issues is being made in a timely manner,” said Dr. Rufus Ewing, President of the Civil Servants Association. “We encourage all civil servants to stand up for their rights and continue to fight for justice.”

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Meantime, CSA President Dr. Ewing, who is also Director of Medical Service, said the CSA will “not allow anyone to destroy our vision and together we will stand to fight for our rights as civil servants and as Turks and Caicos islanders”.

Monday was the first day of a planned two-day strike of public servants in both Providenciales and Grand Turk.

People passing the protest location in front of the Provo Sam’s Downtown building, which houses the immigration department, could count no more than 15 individuals demonstrating, including head of the Civil Service Association (CSA), Dr Rufus Ewing, who was at the microphone attempting to explain the strikers’ goals. The remarks of the former medical director, who himself is on paid leave, did not seem to take issue with looming layoffs but were directed to the size of the severance package for those furloughed.

In Grand Turk, a motorcade of approximately 15 vehicles paraded before government facilities and later approximately 25 strikers and/or supporters were also on the mike urging strikers to join them. Disappointment in the turnout was spoken to by one speaker who claimed she was being encouraged by friends in the Bahamas. One demonstrator not in the designated red garb seemed to taunt new leader of the Peoples Democratic Movement (PDM), Derek Taylor, to come out and join them. Taylor resides in Grand Turk.

While Ewing warned this second strike would be joined by triple the numbers of last week’s strike, the turnout appeared to lose about 90 percent of last week’s support.

PTV, which covered the event, spoke about the disappointing turnout.

Also taking to the TV airwaves, government CEO Martin Stanley expressed support for the people’s right to strike and demonstrate for specific issues. Stanley said that last week’s strikers were more violent and were joined by non-civil servants. Last week’s Provo demonstration included numerous youngsters.