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Scientists explore deepest trough in Caribbean Sea

The Associated Press

The man who discovered the wreckage of the Titanic has turned his attention to the deepest trough of the Caribbean Sea.

Dr. Robert Ballard and dozens of other scientists are diving the Cayman Trough this week and collecting organisms they say can reveal how life might exist on other planets.

The team prepared Thursday for its third dive using remotely operated vehicles.

Katy Croff Bell is chief scientist of the Nautilus Exploration Program. She tells The Associated Press by phone that the team also explored a previously uninvestigated underwater mountain and discovered underwater landslides.

Previous expeditions to the region include the 2010 discovery by British researchers of the world’s deepest known hydrothermal vents.

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The Associated Press

The man who discovered the wreckage of the Titanic has turned his attention to the deepest trough of the Caribbean Sea.

Dr. Robert Ballard and dozens of other scientists are diving the Cayman Trough this week and collecting organisms they say can reveal how life might exist on other planets.

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The team prepared Thursday for its third dive using remotely operated vehicles.

Katy Croff Bell is chief scientist of the Nautilus Exploration Program. She tells The Associated Press by phone that the team also explored a previously uninvestigated underwater mountain and discovered underwater landslides.

Previous expeditions to the region include the 2010 discovery by British researchers of the world’s deepest known hydrothermal vents.