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Police urged to do more to deal with domestic violence cases

Guyana, CMC – The Guyana government is calling on the police to adopt a “firmer” position regarding cases of domestic domestic_violence_944159077violence as the authorities seek to create a national plan to counter violence in all of its manifestations in the country.

Home Affairs Minister Clement Rohee said that a strong signal needed to be sent of the zero-tolerance position with regards to “this scourge”.

According to official figures released here, over the past five years, there have been, on average, an estimated 4, 825 reported cases of domestic violence.

According to the figures three out of 10 persons were charged in 2011, five out of every 10 cases in 2012 and last year, six out of every 10 reports.

“What we have observed from these statistics is that increases in the charge rates correspond to declining numbers of offences reported… while it is understood that the handling of reports of domestic violence can, on occasions, be difficult, I believe that sufficient training has been provided to members of the Guyana Police Force to respond to reports of domestic violence,” Rohee said.

Under the Citizen Security Programme, 18 police stations were remodelled at a total cost of GUY$296.6 million (One Guyana dollar = US$0.004 cents), with a key feature being the construction of special rooms for victims of domestic violence to make their reports in a comfortable, confidential and user friendly environment.

“You are encouraged to make sure that the citizens of Guyana, particularly those who are victims of intra-familial violence, get value for money with the investments made into these projects,” Rohee told the law enforcement officials.

Over the years, the police, as well as the judiciary have been engaged in various training workshops on how to tackle social ills such as domestic violence and the abuse of children.

Last year, the Ministry of Home Affairs hosted a two- day National Conference for the Prevention of Interpersonal Violence, which saw the participation of a wide-cross section of stakeholders including law enforcement, the judicial system, faith-based organisations, civil society and several governmental and non-governmental agencies.

 

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Guyana, CMC – The Guyana government is calling on the police to adopt a “firmer” position regarding cases of domestic domestic_violence_944159077violence as the authorities seek to create a national plan to counter violence in all of its manifestations in the country.

Home Affairs Minister Clement Rohee said that a strong signal needed to be sent of the zero-tolerance position with regards to “this scourge”.

According to official figures released here, over the past five years, there have been, on average, an estimated 4, 825 reported cases of domestic violence.

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According to the figures three out of 10 persons were charged in 2011, five out of every 10 cases in 2012 and last year, six out of every 10 reports.

“What we have observed from these statistics is that increases in the charge rates correspond to declining numbers of offences reported… while it is understood that the handling of reports of domestic violence can, on occasions, be difficult, I believe that sufficient training has been provided to members of the Guyana Police Force to respond to reports of domestic violence,” Rohee said.

Under the Citizen Security Programme, 18 police stations were remodelled at a total cost of GUY$296.6 million (One Guyana dollar = US$0.004 cents), with a key feature being the construction of special rooms for victims of domestic violence to make their reports in a comfortable, confidential and user friendly environment.

“You are encouraged to make sure that the citizens of Guyana, particularly those who are victims of intra-familial violence, get value for money with the investments made into these projects,” Rohee told the law enforcement officials.

Over the years, the police, as well as the judiciary have been engaged in various training workshops on how to tackle social ills such as domestic violence and the abuse of children.

Last year, the Ministry of Home Affairs hosted a two- day National Conference for the Prevention of Interpersonal Violence, which saw the participation of a wide-cross section of stakeholders including law enforcement, the judicial system, faith-based organisations, civil society and several governmental and non-governmental agencies.