Categorized | Letters, News, Opinions

Poisoner leaves dog owner “Brokenhearted”

Cove Final almost versionI am grief-stricken – I’ve been a teary misery since our wonderful dog, Glennie, died recently.  I am bereft.  He was my faithful friend, my constant companion.  He was exceptionally intelligent, affectionate, loyal, patient, gentle, well-mannered – I could go on and on listing his virtues.  He considered me his responsibility, preceded me into every room and checked on me all day.  He anticipated events and sensed when I was blue, at which times he would comfort me with his close presence.  Plato wrote that a dog has the soul of a philosopher and I believe it. 

Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole: Roger Caras.  I agree and have always needed a dog in my life.

Glennie wasn’t destructive or free-roaming; we were aware of the danger of poison in our area and so were careful to avoid it.  I responsibly walked him on his lead every afternoon and my husband took over this practice when I could no longer do so.  Glennie wasn’t old or sick and didn’t have to die.  I believe he was lured to his death by the scent of food, food which had been poisoned.  So I must think his last moments were spent in agonizing pain.  What kind of person would intentionally harm a precious dog?

My husband, too, has been terribly hurt by losing our dear companion.  Friends suggest we adopt a dog from the MAPS shelter, initially to serve as a distraction to help alleviate our overwhelming sadness.  But I wonder if we’d just be condemning yet another to a hideous death by bringing him or her to a neighborhood where a poisoner lurks.  Ours has become a dog-free zone – not by community choice but by a poisoner’s malice!

Words cannot express my profound anger at such a situation.  Because this individual seems to kill on impulse, as the urge takes him (or worse, as a premeditated goal), we are being denied the pleasure of canine companionship.  This state of affairs is infuriating.  There is surely a law against this crime on Montserrat.  Can this abhorrent practice not be stopped? 

S. Simpson

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Cove Final almost versionI am grief-stricken – I’ve been a teary misery since our wonderful dog, Glennie, died recently.  I am bereft.  He was my faithful friend, my constant companion.  He was exceptionally intelligent, affectionate, loyal, patient, gentle, well-mannered – I could go on and on listing his virtues.  He considered me his responsibility, preceded me into every room and checked on me all day.  He anticipated events and sensed when I was blue, at which times he would comfort me with his close presence.  Plato wrote that a dog has the soul of a philosopher and I believe it. 

Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole: Roger Caras.  I agree and have always needed a dog in my life.

Glennie wasn’t destructive or free-roaming; we were aware of the danger of poison in our area and so were careful to avoid it.  I responsibly walked him on his lead every afternoon and my husband took over this practice when I could no longer do so.  Glennie wasn’t old or sick and didn’t have to die.  I believe he was lured to his death by the scent of food, food which had been poisoned.  So I must think his last moments were spent in agonizing pain.  What kind of person would intentionally harm a precious dog?

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My husband, too, has been terribly hurt by losing our dear companion.  Friends suggest we adopt a dog from the MAPS shelter, initially to serve as a distraction to help alleviate our overwhelming sadness.  But I wonder if we’d just be condemning yet another to a hideous death by bringing him or her to a neighborhood where a poisoner lurks.  Ours has become a dog-free zone – not by community choice but by a poisoner’s malice!

Words cannot express my profound anger at such a situation.  Because this individual seems to kill on impulse, as the urge takes him (or worse, as a premeditated goal), we are being denied the pleasure of canine companionship.  This state of affairs is infuriating.  There is surely a law against this crime on Montserrat.  Can this abhorrent practice not be stopped? 

S. Simpson