People with low self-esteem more likely to brag about relationships on Facebook

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC - FEBRUARY 20, 2014: Facebook is an onlinPENNSYLVANIA, United States – If it has ever crossed your mind that the portrayal of certain relationships in Facebook feeds seems too good to be true, there’s a fair chance that you’re right.

According to a new study from Albright College in Pennsylvania, individuals high in Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem (RCSE) – a type of low confidence and self-esteem that is lifted by the perception of a successful relationship – are more likely than others to post hearts-and-flowery content and expressions of joy about their partner.

Such individuals are also more likely to boast about their relationship, and are often driven to monitor the Facebook activities of their partner.

According to Gwendolyn Seidman PhD, assistant-professor of psychology at Albright: “These results suggest that those high in RCSE feel a need to show others, their partners and perhaps themselves that their relationship is ‘OK’ and, thus, they are OK.”

Together with Albright alumna Amanda Havens, Dr Seidman monitored a group of volunteers in relationships ranging in duration from one month to 30 years.

The volunteers were tested on their relationship-related Facebook tendencies, including interacting with their partner online and posting pictures of each other, according to a report in The Atlantic.

The volunteers were also tested on their personalities based on five traits known to psychologists as the “Big Five”: neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

The findings indicated that introverts were more likely to “show off” on Facebook.

Participants high in neuroticism were also more likely to monitor their partner and flaunt their relationship on Facebook.

“This is what we expected, given that neurotic individuals are generally more jealous in their romantic relationships,” Seidman said.

Earlier studies had suggested that extroverts tended to be more active on social media and have larger online networks.

Seidman nevertheless noted that extroverts might be more comfortable to share information with people face-to-face, as opposed to introverts.

Other previous studies indicated that individuals inclined to overshare online might “just want to belong.”

Dr Seidman was nevertheless quick to acknowledge that, based on her research, some Facebook bragging was legitimate.

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PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC - FEBRUARY 20, 2014: Facebook is an onlinPENNSYLVANIA, United States – If it has ever crossed your mind that the portrayal of certain relationships in Facebook feeds seems too good to be true, there’s a fair chance that you’re right.

According to a new study from Albright College in Pennsylvania, individuals high in Relationship Contingent Self-Esteem (RCSE) – a type of low confidence and self-esteem that is lifted by the perception of a successful relationship – are more likely than others to post hearts-and-flowery content and expressions of joy about their partner.

Such individuals are also more likely to boast about their relationship, and are often driven to monitor the Facebook activities of their partner.

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According to Gwendolyn Seidman PhD, assistant-professor of psychology at Albright: “These results suggest that those high in RCSE feel a need to show others, their partners and perhaps themselves that their relationship is ‘OK’ and, thus, they are OK.”

Together with Albright alumna Amanda Havens, Dr Seidman monitored a group of volunteers in relationships ranging in duration from one month to 30 years.

The volunteers were tested on their relationship-related Facebook tendencies, including interacting with their partner online and posting pictures of each other, according to a report in The Atlantic.

The volunteers were also tested on their personalities based on five traits known to psychologists as the “Big Five”: neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

The findings indicated that introverts were more likely to “show off” on Facebook.

Participants high in neuroticism were also more likely to monitor their partner and flaunt their relationship on Facebook.

“This is what we expected, given that neurotic individuals are generally more jealous in their romantic relationships,” Seidman said.

Earlier studies had suggested that extroverts tended to be more active on social media and have larger online networks.

Seidman nevertheless noted that extroverts might be more comfortable to share information with people face-to-face, as opposed to introverts.

Other previous studies indicated that individuals inclined to overshare online might “just want to belong.”

Dr Seidman was nevertheless quick to acknowledge that, based on her research, some Facebook bragging was legitimate.