Categorized | Health, Local, News, Regional

New liquor law cracks down on under-age drinkers

HAMILTON, Bermuda, Sept 30, CMC – A new liquor law, which comes into effect on Wednesday, will crack down on under-age drinking in Bermuda.

The new policy makes it mandatory for bars, clubs and other licensed premises to ask for proof of age from any customers they suspect are under the age of 18.

“The key message of the campaign is ‘No Alcohol under 18 — We Card’,” according to a Ministry of National Security statement.

“What does this mean? It means that if requested, you’ll need to present your photo ID when buying alcohol at any licensed premises, such as a bar, restaurant, grocery store, nightclub or anywhere where alcohol is served.”

Premier Michael Dunkley, who is also National Security Minister, said “the overarching aim of the Liquor Licence Amendment Act 2014 is to add to the safeguards required to prevent under-age drinking.

“Under-age drinking and its associated problems have profound negative consequences for minors, their families, their communities, and the society as a whole.”

The new law was passed in the House of Assembly in July.

 

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

HAMILTON, Bermuda, Sept 30, CMC – A new liquor law, which comes into effect on Wednesday, will crack down on under-age drinking in Bermuda.

The new policy makes it mandatory for bars, clubs and other licensed premises to ask for proof of age from any customers they suspect are under the age of 18.

“The key message of the campaign is ‘No Alcohol under 18 — We Card’,” according to a Ministry of National Security statement.

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“What does this mean? It means that if requested, you’ll need to present your photo ID when buying alcohol at any licensed premises, such as a bar, restaurant, grocery store, nightclub or anywhere where alcohol is served.”

Premier Michael Dunkley, who is also National Security Minister, said “the overarching aim of the Liquor Licence Amendment Act 2014 is to add to the safeguards required to prevent under-age drinking.

“Under-age drinking and its associated problems have profound negative consequences for minors, their families, their communities, and the society as a whole.”

The new law was passed in the House of Assembly in July.