Categorized | Editorial, Local, Regional

Much still depends on Montserrat, HMG insists their commitment

The visiting Minister MP Alan Duncan of DFID, with his team which included recent visitor Deputy DFID head, Ian McKendry, following previous visits from Secretary of State Andrew Mitchell, and other DFID teams are all supposed to be somehow sending or bringing us some message.

One thing is clear, and it is the repeated message that this UK coalition Conservative and Liberal government will stand out like maybe no other British government before it, and probably no other coalition government. Montserrat is like a small ant in the scheme of things of government and politics; and smaller yet in other respects, political, but has a government nonetheless of nine elected members.

GUYANA elections and Government:
On the issue of coalition government, just to digress briefly, Guyana might have wished to take a look at the British Government following their near impasse, still to be played out, and show some maturity on the world stage. Their new president Ramotar, as he heads a minority government by one seat, in spite of what he said in his pledge, “to work steadfastly towards the goal of making Guyana a better place for all, with peace and unity,” as his guiding theme, and his promise, “to be a fair and just president, to govern in the interest of all,” would have done himself and his country real proud to, at least, if even as a token, offer some share proposal to the other parties of twenty-six  and seven seats.

Back to Montserrat. It would appear that the Premier did take his frustration to London last month as Minister Duncan told Bennette Roach of TMR, in answer to the ‘fed-up study program’, “To a large extent, yes, for me, no more unnecessary consultation…”

However, as one of our consultants questioned, ‘is that Social Security contribution a carrot stick?’

What we hear is a repeated position, much strengthened by words of commitment. Studies can be circumvented. Money and support will only be forthcoming after justification, value for money, if things are right, economic benefits. “…we’re not just a checkbook; we have always made that clear. Where we are prepared to sign a check, we want to prove value for money…,” the minister stressed.

The immediate problem that Montserrat faces, is not one that can wait for geothermal, which the Premier admitted could be three to five years away; five years because of the perceived or expected delays, nor a full scale development of Little and Carrs Bays, which is five to ten years away. At least, in comparison we are hearing about money on the ground. Note also in terms of energy, there is the new power plant, which we haven’t heard of, but we hope will encourage some inward investments, problem – that is at least two years away.

Encouraging, is the minister’s view about the port development, which in itself can bring quick hope as to how we move forward primarily in terms of improving access towards the  progress in tourism. But, why is it we still do not hear about the re-opening of the Vue Pointe Hotel? Our economic adviser tells us that it will never be possible without the support of government. And, why not? The reopening of Vue Pointe hotel, we are told and we believe, especially if it had begun right away, even now the hotel could be filled with visitors in February.

Yes, especially now that the emphasis about destroying the Belham Valley is diverted, begin restoring the golf course, reopen the hotel and feel the difference by the end of April. Do I hear laughter or do I see smirks? Yes, there is the problem. The people who would be responsible to see this happen or even to think of a proposal, have ALWAYS seen the ways why NOTHING ever happens, so nothing gets done.

But, by the way, is the Deputy Governor’s office going to respond about the Premier’s continued outrage at the Public Service? They need to understand that part of the value for money is about them, and perhaps, our consultant is thinking, that is all part of the carrot of the Social Security contribution settlement.

The government must take note the economic problem will not be solved by continued money outpouring to developing a public service that does not truly understand its environmental and economic, enabling role; not just a single pet sector, but as many of them as possible to give hope to economic recovery.

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

The visiting Minister MP Alan Duncan of DFID, with his team which included recent visitor Deputy DFID head, Ian McKendry, following previous visits from Secretary of State Andrew Mitchell, and other DFID teams are all supposed to be somehow sending or bringing us some message.

One thing is clear, and it is the repeated message that this UK coalition Conservative and Liberal government will stand out like maybe no other British government before it, and probably no other coalition government. Montserrat is like a small ant in the scheme of things of government and politics; and smaller yet in other respects, political, but has a government nonetheless of nine elected members.

GUYANA elections and Government:
On the issue of coalition government, just to digress briefly, Guyana might have wished to take a look at the British Government following their near impasse, still to be played out, and show some maturity on the world stage. Their new president Ramotar, as he heads a minority government by one seat, in spite of what he said in his pledge, “to work steadfastly towards the goal of making Guyana a better place for all, with peace and unity,” as his guiding theme, and his promise, “to be a fair and just president, to govern in the interest of all,” would have done himself and his country real proud to, at least, if even as a token, offer some share proposal to the other parties of twenty-six  and seven seats.

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Back to Montserrat. It would appear that the Premier did take his frustration to London last month as Minister Duncan told Bennette Roach of TMR, in answer to the ‘fed-up study program’, “To a large extent, yes, for me, no more unnecessary consultation…”

However, as one of our consultants questioned, ‘is that Social Security contribution a carrot stick?’

What we hear is a repeated position, much strengthened by words of commitment. Studies can be circumvented. Money and support will only be forthcoming after justification, value for money, if things are right, economic benefits. “…we’re not just a checkbook; we have always made that clear. Where we are prepared to sign a check, we want to prove value for money…,” the minister stressed.

The immediate problem that Montserrat faces, is not one that can wait for geothermal, which the Premier admitted could be three to five years away; five years because of the perceived or expected delays, nor a full scale development of Little and Carrs Bays, which is five to ten years away. At least, in comparison we are hearing about money on the ground. Note also in terms of energy, there is the new power plant, which we haven’t heard of, but we hope will encourage some inward investments, problem – that is at least two years away.

Encouraging, is the minister’s view about the port development, which in itself can bring quick hope as to how we move forward primarily in terms of improving access towards the  progress in tourism. But, why is it we still do not hear about the re-opening of the Vue Pointe Hotel? Our economic adviser tells us that it will never be possible without the support of government. And, why not? The reopening of Vue Pointe hotel, we are told and we believe, especially if it had begun right away, even now the hotel could be filled with visitors in February.

Yes, especially now that the emphasis about destroying the Belham Valley is diverted, begin restoring the golf course, reopen the hotel and feel the difference by the end of April. Do I hear laughter or do I see smirks? Yes, there is the problem. The people who would be responsible to see this happen or even to think of a proposal, have ALWAYS seen the ways why NOTHING ever happens, so nothing gets done.

But, by the way, is the Deputy Governor’s office going to respond about the Premier’s continued outrage at the Public Service? They need to understand that part of the value for money is about them, and perhaps, our consultant is thinking, that is all part of the carrot of the Social Security contribution settlement.

The government must take note the economic problem will not be solved by continued money outpouring to developing a public service that does not truly understand its environmental and economic, enabling role; not just a single pet sector, but as many of them as possible to give hope to economic recovery.