Leo Varadkar warns Brexit will bring UK ‘decades of economic decline’

Irish Taoiseach says the UK is struggling to get to grips with its loss of global status

Prime Minister Theresa May greets Ireland’s Taoiseach Leo Varadkar in Downing Street (Photo Getty Images)

Ireland’s leader dramatically stepped up the war of words with Westminster yesterday after he predicted the UK would fall into economic decline for decades post-Brexit.

Brexit is undermining 20 years of peace in Ireland, Irish prime minister Leo Varadkar says

In a blistering attack on the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar claimed the country was struggling to come to terms with its diminishing importance on the world stage.

And he warned it would be overtaken as an economic powerhouse first by its European neighbours, followed by the rising powers in Asia.

Irish history

Mr Varadkar pointed to Ireland’s own push for independence from the British Empire 100 years ago, which he described “as the wealthiest and most successful trading bloc in the world at the time”.

The economic case for Irish independence was “weak”, he said, adding it took Ireland 40 years to make economic progress, and he predicted similar problems for the UK post-Brexit.

In an interview with Irish radio station Newstalk, Mr Varadkar said: “A consequence of Brexit for Britain is that it will fall into relative economic decline for many decades, probably be overtaken by France again and slowly over time it’ll be overtaken by lots of countries in Asia.

A lorry passes a poster by calling for “No Border” between Ireland and Northern Ireland, in a post Brexit United the anti-brexit campaign group “Border communities against Brexit” in Jonesborough, Northern Ireland on March 25, 2019, as it crosses the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. – Keeping the Irish border free-flowing has proved to be the toughest issue to resolve in negotiating Britain’s exit from the European Union. The Brexit deal between London and Brussels — overwhelmingly rejected last week by British MPs — contains a so-called backstop provision ensuring that if all else fails, the border will remain open. (Photo by PAUL FAITH / AFP)PAUL FAITH/AFP/Getty Images

‘’One of the difficulties for Britain is they’re struggling to cope with the fact that as a country and an economy they’re not as important in the world as they used to be.”

The Irish premier pointed to growing populations and emerging economies in Asia, such as India, Korea and Vietnam, which were poised to overtake the UK economically.

And he added: “It’s inevitable and that’s why most European countries understand why we need to get together, stick together and integrate so we can preserve our way of life, our prosperity, our peace and security.

Sun setting on Britain

“Britain has never really fully accepted that in the way that France and Germany and Italy did after the war.”

Asked whether Brexit meant that “finally the sun was setting on the British Empire”, he replied: “Perhaps, but that’s their choice, it’s their decision. We have to respect the decisions they make.” Arch-Brexiteer Steve Baker resisted criticising the comments, stating: “I wish him well and I hope we find ways to flourish together because our success will be Ireland’s success.”

https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/boris-johnson-and-jeremy-hunt-spark-twitter-war-as-bbc-andrew-neil-interview-aired/

https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/government-faces-judicial-review-over-eu-citizens-denied-the-vote/

One Response to “Leo Varadkar warns Brexit will bring UK ‘decades of economic decline’”

  1. Matt says:

    Interesting

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Irish Taoiseach says the UK is struggling to get to grips with its loss of global status

Prime Minister Theresa May greets Ireland’s Taoiseach Leo Varadkar in Downing Street (Photo Getty Images)

Ireland’s leader dramatically stepped up the war of words with Westminster yesterday after he predicted the UK would fall into economic decline for decades post-Brexit.

Brexit is undermining 20 years of peace in Ireland, Irish prime minister Leo Varadkar says

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In a blistering attack on the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar claimed the country was struggling to come to terms with its diminishing importance on the world stage.

And he warned it would be overtaken as an economic powerhouse first by its European neighbours, followed by the rising powers in Asia.

Irish history

Mr Varadkar pointed to Ireland’s own push for independence from the British Empire 100 years ago, which he described “as the wealthiest and most successful trading bloc in the world at the time”.

The economic case for Irish independence was “weak”, he said, adding it took Ireland 40 years to make economic progress, and he predicted similar problems for the UK post-Brexit.

In an interview with Irish radio station Newstalk, Mr Varadkar said: “A consequence of Brexit for Britain is that it will fall into relative economic decline for many decades, probably be overtaken by France again and slowly over time it’ll be overtaken by lots of countries in Asia.

A lorry passes a poster by calling for “No Border” between Ireland and Northern Ireland, in a post Brexit United the anti-brexit campaign group “Border communities against Brexit” in Jonesborough, Northern Ireland on March 25, 2019, as it crosses the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. – Keeping the Irish border free-flowing has proved to be the toughest issue to resolve in negotiating Britain’s exit from the European Union. The Brexit deal between London and Brussels — overwhelmingly rejected last week by British MPs — contains a so-called backstop provision ensuring that if all else fails, the border will remain open. (Photo by PAUL FAITH / AFP)PAUL FAITH/AFP/Getty Images

‘’One of the difficulties for Britain is they’re struggling to cope with the fact that as a country and an economy they’re not as important in the world as they used to be.”

The Irish premier pointed to growing populations and emerging economies in Asia, such as India, Korea and Vietnam, which were poised to overtake the UK economically.

And he added: “It’s inevitable and that’s why most European countries understand why we need to get together, stick together and integrate so we can preserve our way of life, our prosperity, our peace and security.

Sun setting on Britain

“Britain has never really fully accepted that in the way that France and Germany and Italy did after the war.”

Asked whether Brexit meant that “finally the sun was setting on the British Empire”, he replied: “Perhaps, but that’s their choice, it’s their decision. We have to respect the decisions they make.” Arch-Brexiteer Steve Baker resisted criticising the comments, stating: “I wish him well and I hope we find ways to flourish together because our success will be Ireland’s success.”

https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/boris-johnson-and-jeremy-hunt-spark-twitter-war-as-bbc-andrew-neil-interview-aired/

https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/government-faces-judicial-review-over-eu-citizens-denied-the-vote/