Categorized | Editorial

Information, Education, entertainment also focus of the newspaper

In the November 12 issue of this medium, Sir Howard Fergus, who just out of habit perhaps, we so prefer to call Dr. Fergus, wrote, “merely to focus attention on the archival value of the newspaper”. He thanked the newspaper, and added: “Some of us appreciate its importance. It becomes in time a source of social, political and economic history.”

More and more, not so much yet in Montserrat, that newspapers must change focus to maintain the interests and meaning once appreciated. That is really only in one particular area. This is particularly so for Montserrat, where the newspaper, is a weekly. To go into further detail on this situation would draw out some of the problems TMR faces and that is not the focus of this. Suffice to say that newspapers will never become extinct, but Montserrat faces a growing and terrible situation although we might discover that it is not alone. Only our circumstances are very different.

Dr. Fergus, in 2002 when he sought to expose his efforts at educating the public about the work of the Constitution Commission, wrote in TMR, “It can be said that the education is inadequate but it cannot be correctly said that there has been no education on the Constitution. What Montserratians need to do is to read the document.”

“What we need is the co-operation of all; and I believe that the Montserratian, media including The Montserrat Reporter, will assist in getting the message out and in stimulating interest in the constitution.  Their commitment to democracy demands this, not to mention their role as agents of public education.”

We wish to point here a most important role that (media, television, radio) the newspaper plays in a society and note that every type of medium in the media has a different role and must each be consulted. Unfortunately, the obligation to inform and educate is very sadly lacking among those who must do so. There is also the unfortunate result in the ignorance of responsibility and obligation to inform and educate, that as long as it is provided to the radio, the job is done.

It might be useful for the statistics department to include in an appropriate survey, carefully worded questions about listenership and readership among the population. If this is done properly, the findings we suggest, would be very informative to how we go forward in planning the future of this country.

On a side, Dr. Fergus further wrote after he noted that turnout to the consultation meetings have been disappointing: “Our strategies for reaching significant populations in Montserrat are fairly comprehensive.  Consultation is the key and consultation there will be.

A review of this would confirm any support he would have for the argument that the recently passed (flawed) Constitution did not have near the required consultation since it was determined to rehash the Commission’s proposal back then.

News presentations and discussions provide the immediate information especially in emergencies and urgent situations via notices etc., but it is only through print publications and repeated viewing that cement information into people’s minds, long after the immediate effect has worn off. There is the situation that people do not ‘really’ listen to the radio. They do so far less than is perceived or believed, even, when the radio is on all day. In any case how many employers would want to know that their workers are listening to the radio all day rather while they claim to be working. This can be tested easily.

To add to all this there are those who indecently boast, Montserratians don’t read, or like to read. There is a wide truth to this, but a little thought to this would explain how the minds in this little island have deteriorated. Here is what a commentator who was noting the questioning of the motive and the financial ability of an individual who was starting a newspaper. “…Rather, it must have been a case of wanting to know what would prompt an individual to invest in a newspaper at a time when readership is declining, largely because people no longer read. In fact, many of them cannot read these days.

If this is true in Montserrat, instead of boasting, shame, they should be the cry and seek to do something about it. We are very aware that many do read the newspaper and other information online. But the material has to be there. We will follow up this discussion.

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

In the November 12 issue of this medium, Sir Howard Fergus, who just out of habit perhaps, we so prefer to call Dr. Fergus, wrote, “merely to focus attention on the archival value of the newspaper”. He thanked the newspaper, and added: “Some of us appreciate its importance. It becomes in time a source of social, political and economic history.”

More and more, not so much yet in Montserrat, that newspapers must change focus to maintain the interests and meaning once appreciated. That is really only in one particular area. This is particularly so for Montserrat, where the newspaper, is a weekly. To go into further detail on this situation would draw out some of the problems TMR faces and that is not the focus of this. Suffice to say that newspapers will never become extinct, but Montserrat faces a growing and terrible situation although we might discover that it is not alone. Only our circumstances are very different.

Dr. Fergus, in 2002 when he sought to expose his efforts at educating the public about the work of the Constitution Commission, wrote in TMR, “It can be said that the education is inadequate but it cannot be correctly said that there has been no education on the Constitution. What Montserratians need to do is to read the document.”

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“What we need is the co-operation of all; and I believe that the Montserratian, media including The Montserrat Reporter, will assist in getting the message out and in stimulating interest in the constitution.  Their commitment to democracy demands this, not to mention their role as agents of public education.”

We wish to point here a most important role that (media, television, radio) the newspaper plays in a society and note that every type of medium in the media has a different role and must each be consulted. Unfortunately, the obligation to inform and educate is very sadly lacking among those who must do so. There is also the unfortunate result in the ignorance of responsibility and obligation to inform and educate, that as long as it is provided to the radio, the job is done.

It might be useful for the statistics department to include in an appropriate survey, carefully worded questions about listenership and readership among the population. If this is done properly, the findings we suggest, would be very informative to how we go forward in planning the future of this country.

On a side, Dr. Fergus further wrote after he noted that turnout to the consultation meetings have been disappointing: “Our strategies for reaching significant populations in Montserrat are fairly comprehensive.  Consultation is the key and consultation there will be.

A review of this would confirm any support he would have for the argument that the recently passed (flawed) Constitution did not have near the required consultation since it was determined to rehash the Commission’s proposal back then.

News presentations and discussions provide the immediate information especially in emergencies and urgent situations via notices etc., but it is only through print publications and repeated viewing that cement information into people’s minds, long after the immediate effect has worn off. There is the situation that people do not ‘really’ listen to the radio. They do so far less than is perceived or believed, even, when the radio is on all day. In any case how many employers would want to know that their workers are listening to the radio all day rather while they claim to be working. This can be tested easily.

To add to all this there are those who indecently boast, Montserratians don’t read, or like to read. There is a wide truth to this, but a little thought to this would explain how the minds in this little island have deteriorated. Here is what a commentator who was noting the questioning of the motive and the financial ability of an individual who was starting a newspaper. “…Rather, it must have been a case of wanting to know what would prompt an individual to invest in a newspaper at a time when readership is declining, largely because people no longer read. In fact, many of them cannot read these days.

If this is true in Montserrat, instead of boasting, shame, they should be the cry and seek to do something about it. We are very aware that many do read the newspaper and other information online. But the material has to be there. We will follow up this discussion.