Categorized | Local, News, Regional

Guyana observes 49 years of political independence

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GEORGETOWN, Guyana, CMC – On May 25, 2015, Guyana celebrated its 49th anniversary of political independence from Britain with many nationals braving the inclement weather to attend the celebrations at the newly refurbished Independence Arch in Brickdam.

The refurbishment was undertaken free of cost by a local business firm with many public spirited citizens contributing to the face-lift of the area.

The Independence Arch was presented by the then Canadian-owned Demerara Bauxite Company (DEMBA) as a gift to the people of Guyana on their achievement of independence from Britain on May 26, 1966.

Newly elected President David Granger led the country in the celebrations as he urged them to continue the work of the founding fathers “to transform a divided colony to a united nation”.

In his address, the head of state said that Guyana had gained its Independence after 350 years of Dutch and British rule and at a time when the Caribbean was moving to ascertain their independence.

“Workers were the pioneers of Independence. It was they who rebelled against British colonialism,” he told the nation.

He said the workers struggled to deal with the stress that followed the first and second World Wars and that rebellions had also taken place from the 1930s throughout the Caribbean resulting in death and injuries.

“Today we pay homage to the workers for their sacrifice,” Granger said, paying respect also to the trade unionists who aided in the pre-independence struggle.

“Independence came in 1966 after decades of distress and distrust let us now not dwell on the pains of the past but look within, to the future,” Granger said, reminding the nation that the struggle of past leaders should be used as the force to drive the country and promote change.

He quoted the country’s first Prime Minister and second president, Linden Forbes Burnham, who said that “independence is a means to an end”.

President Granger said that the initiative now is to encourage change in society and its economics and the treatment of each other as a nation.

As part of the celebrations, eight wreaths were laid representing the trade union movement, military, police, women, youth and politicians. There was also the military parade.

The People’s Progressive Party (PPP), a major architect of Guyana’s independence was invited but the party opted to snob the event, having not recognized the government as being freely and fairly elected during the May 11 regional and general elections

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GEORGETOWN, Guyana, CMC – On May 25, 2015, Guyana celebrated its 49th anniversary of political independence from Britain with many nationals braving the inclement weather to attend the celebrations at the newly refurbished Independence Arch in Brickdam.

The refurbishment was undertaken free of cost by a local business firm with many public spirited citizens contributing to the face-lift of the area.

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The Independence Arch was presented by the then Canadian-owned Demerara Bauxite Company (DEMBA) as a gift to the people of Guyana on their achievement of independence from Britain on May 26, 1966.

Newly elected President David Granger led the country in the celebrations as he urged them to continue the work of the founding fathers “to transform a divided colony to a united nation”.

In his address, the head of state said that Guyana had gained its Independence after 350 years of Dutch and British rule and at a time when the Caribbean was moving to ascertain their independence.

“Workers were the pioneers of Independence. It was they who rebelled against British colonialism,” he told the nation.

He said the workers struggled to deal with the stress that followed the first and second World Wars and that rebellions had also taken place from the 1930s throughout the Caribbean resulting in death and injuries.

“Today we pay homage to the workers for their sacrifice,” Granger said, paying respect also to the trade unionists who aided in the pre-independence struggle.

“Independence came in 1966 after decades of distress and distrust let us now not dwell on the pains of the past but look within, to the future,” Granger said, reminding the nation that the struggle of past leaders should be used as the force to drive the country and promote change.

He quoted the country’s first Prime Minister and second president, Linden Forbes Burnham, who said that “independence is a means to an end”.

President Granger said that the initiative now is to encourage change in society and its economics and the treatment of each other as a nation.

As part of the celebrations, eight wreaths were laid representing the trade union movement, military, police, women, youth and politicians. There was also the military parade.

The People’s Progressive Party (PPP), a major architect of Guyana’s independence was invited but the party opted to snob the event, having not recognized the government as being freely and fairly elected during the May 11 regional and general elections