Categorized | Local, News

Glaucoma awareness week observed, activities hailed a success

Activities beginning March 6, 2011 to mark World Glaucoma Week on the island, were dubbed a success. They were all aimed at raising awareness of glaucoma, an eye disorder which gradually steals sight without warning. Although there is no known cure to date, medication can slow down the process. The chief weapon here is early detection.

On Wednesday, March 9, the St. Peter’s Clinic was the venue selected for the screening programme.

District Nurse Roseline Tuitt Irish, was assigned to the project at St. Peter’s. She told The Montserrat Reporter that ten persons were seen at that location. According to her, glaucoma is a problem on the island of Montserrat. “This is when we advise the patient on what to do if the pressures are found to be high. What they should do, they need to return to see the eye doctor.”

A number of persons reportedly registered at clinics.

There is a tono meter at the St. Peter’s centre. It is used to check the eye pressure and the senior nurses at the clinic point out that the normal reading should be between ten and 21 millimeters of mercury.

Later on Wednesday evening, a March for Sight was staged. Along the route pamphlets were distributed as participants chanted, “Check yuh eyes nah loose yuh sight!” – Check your eyes don’t lose your sight.

Dozens of persons, dressed in white t-shirts, walked from St. John’s Centre to Look Out, around that community and then made their way back to the Look Out Primary School where the march concluded.

Health Promotion Coordinator, Sharon Greenaway gave the procession her nod of approval. “It was better than last year although we had no music…Persons got the message. They need to get a comprehensive eye check. If we are not aware then there would be a set of blind people and this would be more costly to the Government and a strain on the community.” She said.
Participants were drawn from the Roman Catholic, Methodist and Seventh Day Adventist Churches, brownies, Rotaract, Lion’s Club, Nurses’ Association, the police and the Ministry of Health among others.

Jermaine Wade and Dr. Michael Owen

Prior to the march, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Michael Owen and Parliamentary representative Jermaine Wade, made some brief remarks. Dr. Owen described glaucoma as a serious condition which cannot be underestimated. He alluded to the fact that persons need to take their sight more seriously. He called on those within the 35 to 40 age group to get their eyes tested for glaucoma every three to four years. Those above 60 should have it done at least every year.

Dr. Owen handed kudos to the Health Promotion team for organizing the march. He also sees the need for persons to recognize the importance of prevention.

The March for Sight was sponsored by the Lion’s Club while the jerseys came compliments of the St. Patrick’s Action Group.

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Activities beginning March 6, 2011 to mark World Glaucoma Week on the island, were dubbed a success. They were all aimed at raising awareness of glaucoma, an eye disorder which gradually steals sight without warning. Although there is no known cure to date, medication can slow down the process. The chief weapon here is early detection.

On Wednesday, March 9, the St. Peter’s Clinic was the venue selected for the screening programme.

District Nurse Roseline Tuitt Irish, was assigned to the project at St. Peter’s. She told The Montserrat Reporter that ten persons were seen at that location. According to her, glaucoma is a problem on the island of Montserrat. “This is when we advise the patient on what to do if the pressures are found to be high. What they should do, they need to return to see the eye doctor.”

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A number of persons reportedly registered at clinics.

There is a tono meter at the St. Peter’s centre. It is used to check the eye pressure and the senior nurses at the clinic point out that the normal reading should be between ten and 21 millimeters of mercury.

Later on Wednesday evening, a March for Sight was staged. Along the route pamphlets were distributed as participants chanted, “Check yuh eyes nah loose yuh sight!” – Check your eyes don’t lose your sight.

Dozens of persons, dressed in white t-shirts, walked from St. John’s Centre to Look Out, around that community and then made their way back to the Look Out Primary School where the march concluded.

Health Promotion Coordinator, Sharon Greenaway gave the procession her nod of approval. “It was better than last year although we had no music…Persons got the message. They need to get a comprehensive eye check. If we are not aware then there would be a set of blind people and this would be more costly to the Government and a strain on the community.” She said.
Participants were drawn from the Roman Catholic, Methodist and Seventh Day Adventist Churches, brownies, Rotaract, Lion’s Club, Nurses’ Association, the police and the Ministry of Health among others.

Jermaine Wade and Dr. Michael Owen

Prior to the march, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Michael Owen and Parliamentary representative Jermaine Wade, made some brief remarks. Dr. Owen described glaucoma as a serious condition which cannot be underestimated. He alluded to the fact that persons need to take their sight more seriously. He called on those within the 35 to 40 age group to get their eyes tested for glaucoma every three to four years. Those above 60 should have it done at least every year.

Dr. Owen handed kudos to the Health Promotion team for organizing the march. He also sees the need for persons to recognize the importance of prevention.

The March for Sight was sponsored by the Lion’s Club while the jerseys came compliments of the St. Patrick’s Action Group.