Categorized | International, News, Regional

Europe funds project on preventing domestic violence in the Caribbean

by STAFF WRITER

Domestic Violence“Though the majority of victims are females, we need to acknowledge that males are also subject to violence…”

LONDON, Mar 2, CMC – The European Union is providing Euro 400,000 (EC$1,174,552 million) to implement a new project on preventing domestic violence in the Caribbean.

The funds have been awarded to a team of Caribbean and European experts, headed by Professor Adele Jones from the University of Huddersfield, in partnership with The Sweet Water Foundation of Grenada.

The experts said that data will be used to develop interactive, role-playing computer games designed to empower victims and change attitudes that have been linked to aggressive and violent behaviours.

It is often claimed that computer games encourage violence, therefore the idea is to create computer games that can be used in schools to reduce negative attitudes developed in childhood and which can fuel domestic violence in later relationships.

“There is enough evidence to tell us that computer games can generate violence, so what we want to do is look at how we can create an educational tool that might begin to generate empathy – or non-violence,” said Jones.

The two year project, titled “None-in-Three” has been derived from the finding that one in three women and girls experience violence in their lives.

“That’s a fairly global statistic but domestic violence is identified as being particularly entrenched in the Caribbean,” said Jones.

The None-in-Three project will be implemented in Barbados and Grenada and will be launched on March 8 to coincide with celebrations marking International Women’s Day.

“If the numbers we see in domestic violence were applied to other forms of crime, to gang violence or terrorism, the entire region, even the world, would be up in arms, and it would be the lead story on the news all the time,” said EU Ambassador Mikael Barfod.

The computer games will be just one aspect of the initiative, which has been designed to complement existing domestic violence prevention programmes in Barbados and Grenada, where the project is to be implemented.

None-in-Three will also include research with victims in especially vulnerable circumstances, such as disabled women, pregnant women, women living with HIV, women who are trafficked and women from sexual minorities, with the aim of improving access to services and justice for these groups.

“We will also engage with men and youth to find out their perspectives. Though the majority of victims are females, we need to acknowledge that males are also subject to violence and we need a clear take on their views about what are its causes and what can be done,” Jones said.

END

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Domestic Violence“Though the majority of victims are females, we need to acknowledge that males are also subject to violence…”

LONDON, Mar 2, CMC – The European Union is providing Euro 400,000 (EC$1,174,552 million) to implement a new project on preventing domestic violence in the Caribbean.

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The funds have been awarded to a team of Caribbean and European experts, headed by Professor Adele Jones from the University of Huddersfield, in partnership with The Sweet Water Foundation of Grenada.

The experts said that data will be used to develop interactive, role-playing computer games designed to empower victims and change attitudes that have been linked to aggressive and violent behaviours.

It is often claimed that computer games encourage violence, therefore the idea is to create computer games that can be used in schools to reduce negative attitudes developed in childhood and which can fuel domestic violence in later relationships.

“There is enough evidence to tell us that computer games can generate violence, so what we want to do is look at how we can create an educational tool that might begin to generate empathy – or non-violence,” said Jones.

The two year project, titled “None-in-Three” has been derived from the finding that one in three women and girls experience violence in their lives.

“That’s a fairly global statistic but domestic violence is identified as being particularly entrenched in the Caribbean,” said Jones.

The None-in-Three project will be implemented in Barbados and Grenada and will be launched on March 8 to coincide with celebrations marking International Women’s Day.

“If the numbers we see in domestic violence were applied to other forms of crime, to gang violence or terrorism, the entire region, even the world, would be up in arms, and it would be the lead story on the news all the time,” said EU Ambassador Mikael Barfod.

The computer games will be just one aspect of the initiative, which has been designed to complement existing domestic violence prevention programmes in Barbados and Grenada, where the project is to be implemented.

None-in-Three will also include research with victims in especially vulnerable circumstances, such as disabled women, pregnant women, women living with HIV, women who are trafficked and women from sexual minorities, with the aim of improving access to services and justice for these groups.

“We will also engage with men and youth to find out their perspectives. Though the majority of victims are females, we need to acknowledge that males are also subject to violence and we need a clear take on their views about what are its causes and what can be done,” Jones said.

END