Categorized | Local, News

Department of Environment hosts Mountain Chicken Day for children

Montserrat (GIU) – Several of the island’s children were able during the summer holidays to participate in Mountain Chicken Day, through the Darwin Initiative’s project managed by the Department of Environment.

 As the Mountain Chicken Project enters its second year, greater emphasis is being placed on increasing local public awareness of the chytrid fungus crisis and other issues the Critically Endangered Mountain Chicken faces.

The awareness raising programme will initially target the youth, who it is hoped will in turn educate and influence their parents and other adults about issues regarding the Mountain Chicken. A series of educational visits will be made to all schools on island.

Of course, when teaching anyone about the mountain chicken, the most effective classroom is the forest,” said Project Coordinator Sarah-Louise Smith.  “With the assistance of James ‘Scriber’ Daley, our well known Forest Ranger who has vast experience in conducting school trips into the forest, an expedition was held to teach the kids more about what life is like for researchers in the bush.”

The children learnt how to set up transects, practise radio-tracking and swab frogs for samples of chytrid fungus using sterilised swabs; they practised swabbing on the local crapaud (cane toads). They were also taught the importance of bio security and the need for using gloves when handling animals, as well as how the fungus affects the mountain chickens and why it is so important to protect them.

“It was really encouraging and heart warming to see the children enjoying being in the forest,” said Smith. “We will definitely be considering these field days as part of the project educational programme.” The day was regarded as a great success by all, so much so that the project is now considering similar opportunities for adults.

Photo 1: Forest Ranger James ‘Scriber’ Daley demonstrating radio-tracking mountain chickens

Photo 2: Project Coordinator, Sarah-Louise Smith, teaching how to swab a cane toad (Rhinella marina)

 

Leave a Reply

TMR print pages

Newsletter

Archives

https://indd.adobe.com/embed/2b4deb22-cf03-4509-9bbd-938c7e8ecc7d

A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Montserrat (GIU) – Several of the island’s children were able during the summer holidays to participate in Mountain Chicken Day, through the Darwin Initiative’s project managed by the Department of Environment.

 As the Mountain Chicken Project enters its second year, greater emphasis is being placed on increasing local public awareness of the chytrid fungus crisis and other issues the Critically Endangered Mountain Chicken faces.

The awareness raising programme will initially target the youth, who it is hoped will in turn educate and influence their parents and other adults about issues regarding the Mountain Chicken. A series of educational visits will be made to all schools on island.

Insert Ads Here

Of course, when teaching anyone about the mountain chicken, the most effective classroom is the forest,” said Project Coordinator Sarah-Louise Smith.  “With the assistance of James ‘Scriber’ Daley, our well known Forest Ranger who has vast experience in conducting school trips into the forest, an expedition was held to teach the kids more about what life is like for researchers in the bush.”

The children learnt how to set up transects, practise radio-tracking and swab frogs for samples of chytrid fungus using sterilised swabs; they practised swabbing on the local crapaud (cane toads). They were also taught the importance of bio security and the need for using gloves when handling animals, as well as how the fungus affects the mountain chickens and why it is so important to protect them.

“It was really encouraging and heart warming to see the children enjoying being in the forest,” said Smith. “We will definitely be considering these field days as part of the project educational programme.” The day was regarded as a great success by all, so much so that the project is now considering similar opportunities for adults.

Photo 1: Forest Ranger James ‘Scriber’ Daley demonstrating radio-tracking mountain chickens

Photo 2: Project Coordinator, Sarah-Louise Smith, teaching how to swab a cane toad (Rhinella marina)