Categorized | Features, General

De Ole Dawg – Part 14 2016: What about our (updated . . . ?) National Vision?

BRADES, Montserrat, April 12, 2016 – During his budget reply, Hon. Premier Romeo suggested a modification to our national vision statement since 1997, to include going green:

generatorA healthy and wholesome, green Montserrat,
founded upon a thriving modern economy
with a friendly, vibrant community,
in which all our people
through enterprise and initiative,
can fulfill their hopes
in a truly democratic and God-fearing society

A major reason for that is that the Government, through Hon. Minister Lewis, responsible for Energy, has championed the goal that electricity generation for Montserrat should be 100% renewable energy by 2020, in just four years. (Given that  – as the illustration from TMR’s archives shows – two 1.5 – 2 MW geothermal energy wells have already been drilled, that just next door in Antigua, there is a 9-acre 12,000 panel 3 MW solar photovoltaic plant that powers their new airport terminal, and that Montserrat also has an obvious wind energy potential, this should be technically feasible.)

However, as we re-focus our attention on a viable way forward for post-volcano re-development, the national vision points to far more than just geothermal wells and solar photovoltaic plants.

Pardon an aside – for, while key points and concerns in our national vision are less exciting than rhetorical finger-pointing games over ferry “fiascos” and “failed” development corporations, it is the national vision that provides a common foundation for re-building. So, let us re-focus.

For, if Montserrat is to make stable progress, we must be ever more and more:

1] Healthy, wholesome and “green”: A sound society will put good physical and mental health, general wholesomeness and sustainability high on its agenda. Sustainable – “green” – development seeks to better, more fairly meet our needs today and tomorrow. This requires that we study key issues and trends, and that we value and carefully husband our natural, social-cultural and economic surroundings. As one result, incidents such as the wasted spending of millions to break down Gun Hill (also destroying an archaeological site that could have been moved back up the hill and developed as a tourism/historical point of interest) must not happen again:

Tourism

 

2] with a thriving, enterprise-driven modern economy: this requires adequate education and skills-building for our work force, investment capital, a good banking and financial system, as well as encouragement of new business formation. Tourism is an obvious area for development, however many other areas connected to the booming digital sector of the global economy should also be emphasised. Nor should we neglect old fashioned agriculture and construction etc.

3] in which all of our People: A wholesome, growing economy and community will include everyone. Old and new Montserratians alike, men, women, youth, children, rich and poor, the vulnerable and at risk should all be a part of the growth. People are our ultimate resource, and the most valuable single natural resource we have lies between our ears: brains.

4] are able to fulfill their hopes: It is not for nothing that scripture says that we should not muzzle the ox that treads the gain, as even the oxen should enjoy some of the fruit of the harvest. Without hope of benefit and progress for all, little will be achieved. Indeed, if enough people get the consistent message that they are not valued and are locked out of hope for progress, the resulting anger will predictably result in conflicts and undermining of our society.

5] in a truly democratic, God-fearing society: There are two contrasting visions of democracy. One, is that politicians must pander to voters to gain power so they can share out the scarce benefits and spoils of power. The other, is that government is and should be accountable to the people for justice and competence.  However, once we see that (as Rom 13:1 – 10 teaches) the civil authority is God’s servant to do good to the community, bearing the sword in defence of justice, it becomes obvious which vision is sounder and therefore more sustainable.

One way this vision has been given a strategic road-map is through the recent Policy Agenda, which is rooted in the five main goals of the 2008 – 20 Sustainable Development Plan:

I: Prudent Economic Management;

II: Enhanced Human Development;

III: Sustainable Environmental Management and Appropriate Disaster Management Practices,

IV: good governance

V: improved population

This policy agenda lays out the broad basis for reforms. It points to areas for linked capacity-building. It spot-lights points for improvement towards good governance.  And, given the obvious importance of tourism and digital productivity, it helps us build the case for investment in “catalytic” projects that will help spark the investor confidence that will then trigger self-sustaining growth and stable development that will build the prosperity we all desire and need. It is therefore unsurprising to see as a key point in this year’s main budget speech by the Hon Premier and Minister of Finance, Mr Romeo, that:

“. . . this budget calls for reform, and that will have to start with us . . . . We will continue improving our governance as this is the key to unlocking funding from our development partners, as it will give them confidence that their funds will be spent wisely and with due care for value-for-money. It is the funding of key projects through our development partnerships that will spark self-sustaining growth, high quality jobs and sustainable prosperity.”

Let us particularly notice: “We will continue improving our governance as this is the key to unlocking funding from our development partners, as it will give them confidence that their funds will be spent wisely and with due care for value-for-money.”  If we are to move ahead, reforms are a must, towards improved governance as the basis on which business cases and confidence can be built for the long-needed “catalytic” projects required to spark development. If.

END –

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

BRADES, Montserrat, April 12, 2016 – During his budget reply, Hon. Premier Romeo suggested a modification to our national vision statement since 1997, to include going green:

generatorA healthy and wholesome, green Montserrat,
founded upon a thriving modern economy
with a friendly, vibrant community,
in which all our people
through enterprise and initiative,
can fulfill their hopes
in a truly democratic and God-fearing society

A major reason for that is that the Government, through Hon. Minister Lewis, responsible for Energy, has championed the goal that electricity generation for Montserrat should be 100% renewable energy by 2020, in just four years. (Given that  – as the illustration from TMR’s archives shows – two 1.5 – 2 MW geothermal energy wells have already been drilled, that just next door in Antigua, there is a 9-acre 12,000 panel 3 MW solar photovoltaic plant that powers their new airport terminal, and that Montserrat also has an obvious wind energy potential, this should be technically feasible.)

Insert Ads Here

However, as we re-focus our attention on a viable way forward for post-volcano re-development, the national vision points to far more than just geothermal wells and solar photovoltaic plants.

Pardon an aside – for, while key points and concerns in our national vision are less exciting than rhetorical finger-pointing games over ferry “fiascos” and “failed” development corporations, it is the national vision that provides a common foundation for re-building. So, let us re-focus.

For, if Montserrat is to make stable progress, we must be ever more and more:

1] Healthy, wholesome and “green”: A sound society will put good physical and mental health, general wholesomeness and sustainability high on its agenda. Sustainable – “green” – development seeks to better, more fairly meet our needs today and tomorrow. This requires that we study key issues and trends, and that we value and carefully husband our natural, social-cultural and economic surroundings. As one result, incidents such as the wasted spending of millions to break down Gun Hill (also destroying an archaeological site that could have been moved back up the hill and developed as a tourism/historical point of interest) must not happen again:

Tourism

 

2] with a thriving, enterprise-driven modern economy: this requires adequate education and skills-building for our work force, investment capital, a good banking and financial system, as well as encouragement of new business formation. Tourism is an obvious area for development, however many other areas connected to the booming digital sector of the global economy should also be emphasised. Nor should we neglect old fashioned agriculture and construction etc.

3] in which all of our People: A wholesome, growing economy and community will include everyone. Old and new Montserratians alike, men, women, youth, children, rich and poor, the vulnerable and at risk should all be a part of the growth. People are our ultimate resource, and the most valuable single natural resource we have lies between our ears: brains.

4] are able to fulfill their hopes: It is not for nothing that scripture says that we should not muzzle the ox that treads the gain, as even the oxen should enjoy some of the fruit of the harvest. Without hope of benefit and progress for all, little will be achieved. Indeed, if enough people get the consistent message that they are not valued and are locked out of hope for progress, the resulting anger will predictably result in conflicts and undermining of our society.

5] in a truly democratic, God-fearing society: There are two contrasting visions of democracy. One, is that politicians must pander to voters to gain power so they can share out the scarce benefits and spoils of power. The other, is that government is and should be accountable to the people for justice and competence.  However, once we see that (as Rom 13:1 – 10 teaches) the civil authority is God’s servant to do good to the community, bearing the sword in defence of justice, it becomes obvious which vision is sounder and therefore more sustainable.

One way this vision has been given a strategic road-map is through the recent Policy Agenda, which is rooted in the five main goals of the 2008 – 20 Sustainable Development Plan:

I: Prudent Economic Management;

II: Enhanced Human Development;

III: Sustainable Environmental Management and Appropriate Disaster Management Practices,

IV: good governance

V: improved population

This policy agenda lays out the broad basis for reforms. It points to areas for linked capacity-building. It spot-lights points for improvement towards good governance.  And, given the obvious importance of tourism and digital productivity, it helps us build the case for investment in “catalytic” projects that will help spark the investor confidence that will then trigger self-sustaining growth and stable development that will build the prosperity we all desire and need. It is therefore unsurprising to see as a key point in this year’s main budget speech by the Hon Premier and Minister of Finance, Mr Romeo, that:

“. . . this budget calls for reform, and that will have to start with us . . . . We will continue improving our governance as this is the key to unlocking funding from our development partners, as it will give them confidence that their funds will be spent wisely and with due care for value-for-money. It is the funding of key projects through our development partnerships that will spark self-sustaining growth, high quality jobs and sustainable prosperity.”

Let us particularly notice: “We will continue improving our governance as this is the key to unlocking funding from our development partners, as it will give them confidence that their funds will be spent wisely and with due care for value-for-money.”  If we are to move ahead, reforms are a must, towards improved governance as the basis on which business cases and confidence can be built for the long-needed “catalytic” projects required to spark development. If.

END –