Coronavirus: Schools, colleges and childcare facilities in Ireland to shut

Reprint – from the Irish Times

Shutdown starts this evening and runs until March 29th, restrictions placed on gatherings

TMR Editor: With the banning of gatherings of travel all around the western world, and we can specify as it gets closer to home in many close ways, the UK and the US, questions are now looming and becoming somewhat vocal. What is the Montserrat, local government doing in the face of all that?

The next question with the announced preparations (for protection) the serious and important question is also asked, somewhere, ” Have any extra resources been allocated to Montserrat, by the UK out of the huge allocation towards this ‘pandemic’
Do we have the capability to test? Can we detect the disease?
If we cannot even detect the disease, how are we going to slow the spread?

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar outlining the new measures at Blair House, Washington DC, on Thursday. Photograph: PA
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar outlining the new measures at Blair House, Washington DC, on Thursday. Photograph: PA

Pat Leahy, Paul Cullen, Suzanne Lynch, Fiach Kelly

Schools, colleges and other public facilities are set to close in the Republic from this evening for at least two weeks in response to the spread of coronavirus.

Speaking from Washington DC on Thursday Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said the measures being announced today would remain in place until March 29th and would be kept under review.

From 6 pm, schools, colleges, and childcare facilities will close, Mr. Varadkar said. Cultural centres will also close, he said.

The Government is also banning indoor gatherings of more than 100 people, and outdoor gatherings of more than 500 people.

People should continue to go to work if they can, but those who are able to work from home should do so, he added.

Shops and supply chains will remain open, the Taoiseach said, and cafes and restaurants can remain open. He also said people should minimise social interaction where possible.

Public transport will continue to operate.

Mr. Varadkar did not comment on the US travel ban announced last night. The ban applies to visitors from most European states, but not Ireland.

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The Mater Hospital announced it is limiting activity to essential services from Thursday.

The announcement comes a day after the first death from coronavirus was recorded in the Republic.

In a statement on Thursday, the hospital said all outpatient appointments and elective surgeries would be “limited to essential services only until further notice”.

It said: “The Mater regrets the impact that this will have on our patients but these new arrangements are necessary in order to deal with the impact of Covid-19.”

Patients whose appointments are being deferred will be contacted by phone, the hospital said, adding every effort is being made to manage and control the spread of coronavirus.

“Our staff across every part of the hospital are carrying out Trojan work around the clock to deal with the virus, care for those infected and to protect and care for other patients in the hospital,” it said.

Visitor restrictions remain in place at the hospital. The only visitors allowed are those visiting patients in critical care, vulnerable young adults or those whose loved ones are receiving end-of-life care, the hospital said. No children are permitted to visit the hospital.

The public has been told to limit its social interactions and stop shaking hands with others as part of enhanced containment measures following the announcement of the first death from the disease.

The elderly woman had an underlying condition that was terminal and died on Wednesday at Naas General Hospital.

“The death took place in the last 24 hours. The diagnosis was part of the certification of the death of the individual,” chief medical officer Dr. Tony Holohan said on Wednesday night.

A number of other patients in hospital with the disease are understood to be seriously ill.

The National Public Health Emergency Team said on Wednesday evening that containment measures would now be enhanced. It asked members of the public to “consider how to limit your social interactions” and to “avoid indoor, crowded spaces”, shaking hands and “close personal contact”.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) for the first time yesterday labeled the coronavirus a pandemic, adding Italy and Iran were on the front line of the disease and other countries would soon join them.

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Reprint – from the Irish Times

Shutdown starts this evening and runs until March 29th, restrictions placed on gatherings

TMR Editor: With the banning of gatherings of travel all around the western world, and we can specify as it gets closer to home in many close ways, the UK and the US, questions are now looming and becoming somewhat vocal. What is the Montserrat, local government doing in the face of all that?

The next question with the announced preparations (for protection) the serious and important question is also asked, somewhere, ” Have any extra resources been allocated to Montserrat, by the UK out of the huge allocation towards this ‘pandemic’
Do we have the capability to test? Can we detect the disease?
If we cannot even detect the disease, how are we going to slow the spread?

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Taoiseach Leo Varadkar outlining the new measures at Blair House, Washington DC, on Thursday. Photograph: PA
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar outlining the new measures at Blair House, Washington DC, on Thursday. Photograph: PA

Pat Leahy, Paul Cullen, Suzanne Lynch, Fiach Kelly

Schools, colleges and other public facilities are set to close in the Republic from this evening for at least two weeks in response to the spread of coronavirus.

Speaking from Washington DC on Thursday Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said the measures being announced today would remain in place until March 29th and would be kept under review.

From 6 pm, schools, colleges, and childcare facilities will close, Mr. Varadkar said. Cultural centres will also close, he said.

The Government is also banning indoor gatherings of more than 100 people, and outdoor gatherings of more than 500 people.

People should continue to go to work if they can, but those who are able to work from home should do so, he added.

Shops and supply chains will remain open, the Taoiseach said, and cafes and restaurants can remain open. He also said people should minimise social interaction where possible.

Public transport will continue to operate.

Mr. Varadkar did not comment on the US travel ban announced last night. The ban applies to visitors from most European states, but not Ireland.

Related

Protect yourself

News Digests

Stay on top of the latest news SIGN UP HERE

The Mater Hospital announced it is limiting activity to essential services from Thursday.

The announcement comes a day after the first death from coronavirus was recorded in the Republic.

In a statement on Thursday, the hospital said all outpatient appointments and elective surgeries would be “limited to essential services only until further notice”.

It said: “The Mater regrets the impact that this will have on our patients but these new arrangements are necessary in order to deal with the impact of Covid-19.”

Patients whose appointments are being deferred will be contacted by phone, the hospital said, adding every effort is being made to manage and control the spread of coronavirus.

“Our staff across every part of the hospital are carrying out Trojan work around the clock to deal with the virus, care for those infected and to protect and care for other patients in the hospital,” it said.

Visitor restrictions remain in place at the hospital. The only visitors allowed are those visiting patients in critical care, vulnerable young adults or those whose loved ones are receiving end-of-life care, the hospital said. No children are permitted to visit the hospital.

The public has been told to limit its social interactions and stop shaking hands with others as part of enhanced containment measures following the announcement of the first death from the disease.

The elderly woman had an underlying condition that was terminal and died on Wednesday at Naas General Hospital.

“The death took place in the last 24 hours. The diagnosis was part of the certification of the death of the individual,” chief medical officer Dr. Tony Holohan said on Wednesday night.

A number of other patients in hospital with the disease are understood to be seriously ill.

The National Public Health Emergency Team said on Wednesday evening that containment measures would now be enhanced. It asked members of the public to “consider how to limit your social interactions” and to “avoid indoor, crowded spaces”, shaking hands and “close personal contact”.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) for the first time yesterday labeled the coronavirus a pandemic, adding Italy and Iran were on the front line of the disease and other countries would soon join them.