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Consultation on the nutrition module of the survey of living condition

A two-day consultative workshop attended by the workers of the Ministry of Health, the Environmental Health Department, Agriculture Department, representatives from various organizations and agencies and the media was held on Tuesday, April 24- Wednesday, April 25, 2012 at the Culture Centre in Little Bay. The workshop was on the nutrition module of the survey of living condition.

Ms. Deonne Caines

Two members from The Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute (CFNI) were on island to assist the Ministry of Health with the facilitating the workshop.  The facilitators were Mrs. Beverly Lawrence and Miss Deonne Caines.

Mrs. Beverly Lawrence

Speaking at the opening Ceremony Nutrition Officer at the Ministry of health, Miss Muanelva Taylor told the participants that in 2008 it was decided that Montserrat should undertake the process of looking at the population’s consumption patterns.

“In 2008 when it was decided that Montserrat should undertake the process of looking at the population consumption patterns.  National food and consumption surveys were only completed in four countries, with smaller surveys been done in some of the other countries.

Ms. Dorothea Hazel

Montserrat was in a similar position as other Caribbean countries, very limited data available on dietary pattern. The lack of data or dietary pattern of the population has limited the country’s ability to effectively plan program s for safe guarding food security as well as preventing and managing obesity and other non-communicable chronic diseases.”

Mr. Trevor Howe

Miss Taylor said some may question the relevance of the data since it was collected in 2009. She assured the participants that the data is still significant as the evidence emerging shows that the Caribbean is experiencing significant increases in the prevalence of obesity and nutrition related chronic diseases.

“Increasing food prices and food shortages, impact our food security and therefore our consumption patterns,” she said.

Ms. Melissa O'Garro

Mrs. Lawrence in her brief opening remarks stated that although persons are more aware of what they eat and the impact that it has on their health, indications are, that their consumption patterns show great unbalances and gaps in the quality.  She said, “One major concern that is common throughout all countries is the excess calories that we consume and these calories come mainly from fats and sugars. This has resulted in data which shows that over 25% of adult population is overweight or obese, while at the same time that people have become less active.”

 

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A two-day consultative workshop attended by the workers of the Ministry of Health, the Environmental Health Department, Agriculture Department, representatives from various organizations and agencies and the media was held on Tuesday, April 24- Wednesday, April 25, 2012 at the Culture Centre in Little Bay. The workshop was on the nutrition module of the survey of living condition.

Ms. Deonne Caines

Two members from The Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute (CFNI) were on island to assist the Ministry of Health with the facilitating the workshop.  The facilitators were Mrs. Beverly Lawrence and Miss Deonne Caines.

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Mrs. Beverly Lawrence

Speaking at the opening Ceremony Nutrition Officer at the Ministry of health, Miss Muanelva Taylor told the participants that in 2008 it was decided that Montserrat should undertake the process of looking at the population’s consumption patterns.

“In 2008 when it was decided that Montserrat should undertake the process of looking at the population consumption patterns.  National food and consumption surveys were only completed in four countries, with smaller surveys been done in some of the other countries.

Ms. Dorothea Hazel

Montserrat was in a similar position as other Caribbean countries, very limited data available on dietary pattern. The lack of data or dietary pattern of the population has limited the country’s ability to effectively plan program s for safe guarding food security as well as preventing and managing obesity and other non-communicable chronic diseases.”

Mr. Trevor Howe

Miss Taylor said some may question the relevance of the data since it was collected in 2009. She assured the participants that the data is still significant as the evidence emerging shows that the Caribbean is experiencing significant increases in the prevalence of obesity and nutrition related chronic diseases.

“Increasing food prices and food shortages, impact our food security and therefore our consumption patterns,” she said.

Ms. Melissa O'Garro

Mrs. Lawrence in her brief opening remarks stated that although persons are more aware of what they eat and the impact that it has on their health, indications are, that their consumption patterns show great unbalances and gaps in the quality.  She said, “One major concern that is common throughout all countries is the excess calories that we consume and these calories come mainly from fats and sugars. This has resulted in data which shows that over 25% of adult population is overweight or obese, while at the same time that people have become less active.”