CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTION: I will not vote!

 Man from Baker Hill

I cannot vote! I have objected to the inclusion of my name on the 2014 voters list.

But three cheers for Montserrat, Hip, hip hooray! This election-day there will be about 3000 registered voters, 31 candidates of which 13 are independents; and maybe 20,000 votes cast.

What has happened to politics in Montserrat? Has it lost its essence? Should every candidate be an entire party? Is political representation something to joke about? I am almost sure that historians have begun to consider Montserrat elections as just another eruption for thunderous Caribbean laughter. And collectively, from captain to cook, we are responsible.

Since the volcanic eruptions the average population on Montserrat has been around 5,000 persons; but an aggregate of 100 candidates have sought to become parliamentarians. Since the eruptions began in 1995, an aggregate of 10 political parties and 30 independent candidates have contested the elections.

Comparatively, Antigua and St. Kitts each has populations numbering tens of thousands, but two political parties each. Jamaica and Trinidad each has two political parties to represent their millions.

Believe me; I have had enough of Montserrat politics and elections. And I shall record my boycott of the 2014 elections, now.

So for this election 2014, I shall not vote! I will be a conscientious objector.

I feel very strongly about political representation. I would be insulting you if I were to ask you to vote for me in an election for the position supervisor of elections. I have neither training nor experience to represent the people of Montserrat at that position.

Consider this; I have never been associated with a political party, never. I have been to the Legislative Assembly less than six times in my entire life. I would therefore consider myself rude and obnoxious, if I were to ask Montserratians to vote for me in an election so that I might become the next Premier of Montserrat or leader of the opposition. I would not know where to begin to serve or represent Montserrat.

And if I were to ask you to vote for me to be the next chairman of the Christian Council, I expect that Montserratians would laugh at me; and the entire Christian world would laugh at you too for even considering my request. Because I do not belong to any church; and I have never shown interest in matters pertaining to affairs of the Christian Council. I cannot represent the Christian Council.

Please know this; I have already requested that the Electoral Office remove my name from the voters list. I am a conscientious objector. I cannot vote.

Here is my story. In 1978, shortly after I returned to Montserrat, I asked my father not to offer himself again as a candidate for the North-Western electoral constituency. I also asked my sister to speak to our father on the matter; she did. We felt that our father could not offer Montserrat the kind of representation which it deserved for the 1980’s and beyond. We however encouraged our father to continue to support his chosen political party. And he did. He continued to campaign for his party five days a week, twelve months a year; he did, year after year until his death. Our father was intelligent and courageous; and he loved politics. He aroused my interest in politics.

I believe in good political representation. And as a result I never voted until 1991 when there was a viable alternative to the incumbent PLM candidate in the North-Western constituency.

Also, I never seriously thought of being a candidate for political office. However, immediately after the 2009 elections I felt very badly that I did not offer myself to represent the people of Montserrat. And I cried. Yes, I shed tears. Soon I began to feel a pull to become a parliamentarian. I wanted to represent Montserrat as a politician. So I begged and was granted permission to be included in the training being given to the new members of the Legislative Assembly. Shortly thereafter I began to attend Legislative Assembly meetings. But before long, I lost the passion to be a parliamentarian and decided to return to my preferred role as a social and political critic.

I am happy to contribute to Montserrat as a social and political critic. Historically I am not even a voter; you would be amazed at the tactics I devised to avoid voting. As mentioned above, I never voted before the 1991 general elections; but since 2001 I have not been able to vote intelligently. I constantly had to juggle my X’s among family, friends and foe; some of whom are not suitable to represent me or Montserrat politically.

Now look what they have done to me! I am now a Conscientious Objector. I had to beg my best friend to please object to my name being included on the voters list. And he did; he sent an objection to the Electoral Office.

So far, that’s my story. But please do not misunderstand me. I am a political critic; but I am constructive. I am man of good character; I am helpful, truthful and peaceful; I am kind, courteous and courageous. I am knowledgeable; I am a chartered insurance practitioner; and I am a trained accountant too. I studied law, taxation and economics too. I have managed and I have lead; I was a director of the Montserrat Chamber of Commerce, the Montserrat National Trust and the Bank of Montserrat too. I am trustworthy and honest. I managed the local branch of an insurance company; and during my employment with the company I processed and paid over $50 million in insurance claims without accepting $1.00 in bribes. I am the son of R. Cook (Smoothie) Allen, the courageous politician from Baker Hill. I am of, by, with and from political pedigree. I learned politics at our dinner table. I could represent Montserrat politically; but I am not a politician.

As mentioned above, In 1978 I influenced my father to consider his suitability to represent Montserrat politically. But this year 2014, I will not attempt to ask any candidate to question his or her ability and suitability with regards to political representation for Montserrat in the 21st century.

Nevertheless, I will passionately examine each candidate with respect to representation. And if I believe that a candidate cannot represent me, I should tell him. I should tell him that I do not want him to represent me. I should be able to ask him to remove himself from in front of me and do not insult me. But I will not do any of those things. No, I will not judge any candidate by my standards.

Instead, I declare this. I am a conscientious objector. I protest against the state of politics and political representation in Montserrat 2014. I shall not vote!

And through this article, for the third time, I humbly beg the Electoral Office to remove my name from the 2014 voters list. Because I shall not vote!

 And I believe there are others, e.g. like my boss!

 

I am, sincerely

 

Your Conscientious Objector.

 

 

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

 Man from Baker Hill

I cannot vote! I have objected to the inclusion of my name on the 2014 voters list.

But three cheers for Montserrat, Hip, hip hooray! This election-day there will be about 3000 registered voters, 31 candidates of which 13 are independents; and maybe 20,000 votes cast.

Insert Ads Here

What has happened to politics in Montserrat? Has it lost its essence? Should every candidate be an entire party? Is political representation something to joke about? I am almost sure that historians have begun to consider Montserrat elections as just another eruption for thunderous Caribbean laughter. And collectively, from captain to cook, we are responsible.

Since the volcanic eruptions the average population on Montserrat has been around 5,000 persons; but an aggregate of 100 candidates have sought to become parliamentarians. Since the eruptions began in 1995, an aggregate of 10 political parties and 30 independent candidates have contested the elections.

Comparatively, Antigua and St. Kitts each has populations numbering tens of thousands, but two political parties each. Jamaica and Trinidad each has two political parties to represent their millions.

Believe me; I have had enough of Montserrat politics and elections. And I shall record my boycott of the 2014 elections, now.

So for this election 2014, I shall not vote! I will be a conscientious objector.

I feel very strongly about political representation. I would be insulting you if I were to ask you to vote for me in an election for the position supervisor of elections. I have neither training nor experience to represent the people of Montserrat at that position.

Consider this; I have never been associated with a political party, never. I have been to the Legislative Assembly less than six times in my entire life. I would therefore consider myself rude and obnoxious, if I were to ask Montserratians to vote for me in an election so that I might become the next Premier of Montserrat or leader of the opposition. I would not know where to begin to serve or represent Montserrat.

And if I were to ask you to vote for me to be the next chairman of the Christian Council, I expect that Montserratians would laugh at me; and the entire Christian world would laugh at you too for even considering my request. Because I do not belong to any church; and I have never shown interest in matters pertaining to affairs of the Christian Council. I cannot represent the Christian Council.

Please know this; I have already requested that the Electoral Office remove my name from the voters list. I am a conscientious objector. I cannot vote.

Here is my story. In 1978, shortly after I returned to Montserrat, I asked my father not to offer himself again as a candidate for the North-Western electoral constituency. I also asked my sister to speak to our father on the matter; she did. We felt that our father could not offer Montserrat the kind of representation which it deserved for the 1980’s and beyond. We however encouraged our father to continue to support his chosen political party. And he did. He continued to campaign for his party five days a week, twelve months a year; he did, year after year until his death. Our father was intelligent and courageous; and he loved politics. He aroused my interest in politics.

I believe in good political representation. And as a result I never voted until 1991 when there was a viable alternative to the incumbent PLM candidate in the North-Western constituency.

Also, I never seriously thought of being a candidate for political office. However, immediately after the 2009 elections I felt very badly that I did not offer myself to represent the people of Montserrat. And I cried. Yes, I shed tears. Soon I began to feel a pull to become a parliamentarian. I wanted to represent Montserrat as a politician. So I begged and was granted permission to be included in the training being given to the new members of the Legislative Assembly. Shortly thereafter I began to attend Legislative Assembly meetings. But before long, I lost the passion to be a parliamentarian and decided to return to my preferred role as a social and political critic.

I am happy to contribute to Montserrat as a social and political critic. Historically I am not even a voter; you would be amazed at the tactics I devised to avoid voting. As mentioned above, I never voted before the 1991 general elections; but since 2001 I have not been able to vote intelligently. I constantly had to juggle my X’s among family, friends and foe; some of whom are not suitable to represent me or Montserrat politically.

Now look what they have done to me! I am now a Conscientious Objector. I had to beg my best friend to please object to my name being included on the voters list. And he did; he sent an objection to the Electoral Office.

So far, that’s my story. But please do not misunderstand me. I am a political critic; but I am constructive. I am man of good character; I am helpful, truthful and peaceful; I am kind, courteous and courageous. I am knowledgeable; I am a chartered insurance practitioner; and I am a trained accountant too. I studied law, taxation and economics too. I have managed and I have lead; I was a director of the Montserrat Chamber of Commerce, the Montserrat National Trust and the Bank of Montserrat too. I am trustworthy and honest. I managed the local branch of an insurance company; and during my employment with the company I processed and paid over $50 million in insurance claims without accepting $1.00 in bribes. I am the son of R. Cook (Smoothie) Allen, the courageous politician from Baker Hill. I am of, by, with and from political pedigree. I learned politics at our dinner table. I could represent Montserrat politically; but I am not a politician.

As mentioned above, In 1978 I influenced my father to consider his suitability to represent Montserrat politically. But this year 2014, I will not attempt to ask any candidate to question his or her ability and suitability with regards to political representation for Montserrat in the 21st century.

Nevertheless, I will passionately examine each candidate with respect to representation. And if I believe that a candidate cannot represent me, I should tell him. I should tell him that I do not want him to represent me. I should be able to ask him to remove himself from in front of me and do not insult me. But I will not do any of those things. No, I will not judge any candidate by my standards.

Instead, I declare this. I am a conscientious objector. I protest against the state of politics and political representation in Montserrat 2014. I shall not vote!

And through this article, for the third time, I humbly beg the Electoral Office to remove my name from the 2014 voters list. Because I shall not vote!

 And I believe there are others, e.g. like my boss!

 

I am, sincerely

 

Your Conscientious Objector.