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Commentary: Living the holy life

TCI News Now 
By Oliver Mills

Oliver MillsAll of us would like to go about our daily lives being positive, despite our experiences. We would always like to be self-assured, to have the kind of knowledge that enables us to make the right choices at the right time, and in the right places, and not experience any regrets, unease, or fear.

We also wish that we could all live in a world of total friendship, where smiles and cheers are part of our normal existence, and where our friend is our neighbour, and our neighbour is our friend.

And we would love a world of internal and external peace, where the need to reprimand does not exist, where jealousy, hate, and conspiracies are unthinkable, and where we treasure, and affirm each other’s goodness.

This kind and quality of life is possible, and we can have it all. Indeed, these qualities are within us, waiting for us to access them, and live them. Going about our lives, doing the right thing, and doing it right, means we will not be blamed for anything. When we are without blame, we do not feel guilty of anything. Nothing can be held against us and, as a result, our minds will always be full of joy, gladness, and peace.

We can therefore sleep peacefully, and without worry. As a result, we live healthier lives and longer lives too. These qualities are part of our holy nature, which keeps us centered, and connected to what is divine within us.

Two of the most important qualities that will help us to live holy and exemplary lives are always speaking the truth, and avoid slandering each other. When we are truthful about any situation, others trust us more, respect us more, and admire the way we live more. Speaking the truth means we are honest, and above board.

It also means we are helpful in making others aware that they have fallen from the kind of behaviour that could be detrimental to the plans they set for themselves and their family. We could then counsel them to have a more life-affirming behaviour, which would also bring them honour, by setting them on a more noble course.

When we avoid slandering each other, we transcend ourselves, and the situation that could provoke us to slander each other. Slander is replaced by helpfulness, and good guidance, which uplifts the other. A better person emerges, with transformed attitudes, and a committed willingness to do better.

If we should slander each other, it brings even more slander, and a situation could be brought about which does no good for anyone. Replacing slander with compassion, and forgiveness, brings out what is holy within us, the good, highest part of ourselves, which once hidden, now comes alive to restore us, and others to what, and who we were meant to be.

Sometimes we go about our lives with preconceived attitudes about others. We sometimes even haven’t met a particular person before, but when we do, we form an attitude about them. It could be pleasant, or belittling. If it is the latter, then we dishonour the person, and ourselves, and we may deny ourselves the opportunity to have a new friend.

We experience a loss, and we in turn lose someone, who may be the very person who could be the greatest help, or asset to us. The loss is also mutual. When this happens, we have usually ignored the holy urgings within us, encouraging a positive contact. We therefore let the chance to show holiness in our lives slip away temporarily.

However, if we should greet the person with friendship, and a caring disposition, this reflects the holiness within us. We will find that the person is very responsive and cordial, even quite helpful in assisting us to clarify, or put a new light on a situation that had been bothering us for some time.

What happens in this meeting is that two holy natures connect with each other, and the outcome is joy for each of us. This shows that when we approach each other in a spirit of holiness and kindness, miracles happen, for real. We not only honour them, but honour ourselves as well.

Keeping our word to others, and ourselves, and not permitting ourselves to be bought, are also important attributes of holiness. When we keep our word, our credibility is strengthened, and our character is enhanced. Others can depend on us to do what we said we would, and when we deliver, we contribute to the satisfaction of a fellow human being.

And not allowing ourselves to have a price, in the social market, adds to our stature as a dignified human person, with ethical and moral principles, which cannot be breached. Our character and integrity then become exemplary, and others seek to emulate our values.

This is the essence of a holy life worth having, and worth living too. We then become aware that earth is really in heaven, and heaven is really on earth.

Pic Oliver Mills

 

Oliver Mills is a former lecturer in education at the University of the West Indies Mona Campus. He holds an M.Ed degree. from Dalhousie University in Canada, an MA from the University of London and a post-graduate diploma in HRM and Training, University of Leicester. He is a past Permanent Secretary in Education with the government of the Turks and Caicos Islands

 

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

TCI News Now 
By Oliver Mills

Oliver MillsAll of us would like to go about our daily lives being positive, despite our experiences. We would always like to be self-assured, to have the kind of knowledge that enables us to make the right choices at the right time, and in the right places, and not experience any regrets, unease, or fear.

We also wish that we could all live in a world of total friendship, where smiles and cheers are part of our normal existence, and where our friend is our neighbour, and our neighbour is our friend.

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And we would love a world of internal and external peace, where the need to reprimand does not exist, where jealousy, hate, and conspiracies are unthinkable, and where we treasure, and affirm each other’s goodness.

This kind and quality of life is possible, and we can have it all. Indeed, these qualities are within us, waiting for us to access them, and live them. Going about our lives, doing the right thing, and doing it right, means we will not be blamed for anything. When we are without blame, we do not feel guilty of anything. Nothing can be held against us and, as a result, our minds will always be full of joy, gladness, and peace.

We can therefore sleep peacefully, and without worry. As a result, we live healthier lives and longer lives too. These qualities are part of our holy nature, which keeps us centered, and connected to what is divine within us.

Two of the most important qualities that will help us to live holy and exemplary lives are always speaking the truth, and avoid slandering each other. When we are truthful about any situation, others trust us more, respect us more, and admire the way we live more. Speaking the truth means we are honest, and above board.

It also means we are helpful in making others aware that they have fallen from the kind of behaviour that could be detrimental to the plans they set for themselves and their family. We could then counsel them to have a more life-affirming behaviour, which would also bring them honour, by setting them on a more noble course.

When we avoid slandering each other, we transcend ourselves, and the situation that could provoke us to slander each other. Slander is replaced by helpfulness, and good guidance, which uplifts the other. A better person emerges, with transformed attitudes, and a committed willingness to do better.

If we should slander each other, it brings even more slander, and a situation could be brought about which does no good for anyone. Replacing slander with compassion, and forgiveness, brings out what is holy within us, the good, highest part of ourselves, which once hidden, now comes alive to restore us, and others to what, and who we were meant to be.

Sometimes we go about our lives with preconceived attitudes about others. We sometimes even haven’t met a particular person before, but when we do, we form an attitude about them. It could be pleasant, or belittling. If it is the latter, then we dishonour the person, and ourselves, and we may deny ourselves the opportunity to have a new friend.

We experience a loss, and we in turn lose someone, who may be the very person who could be the greatest help, or asset to us. The loss is also mutual. When this happens, we have usually ignored the holy urgings within us, encouraging a positive contact. We therefore let the chance to show holiness in our lives slip away temporarily.

However, if we should greet the person with friendship, and a caring disposition, this reflects the holiness within us. We will find that the person is very responsive and cordial, even quite helpful in assisting us to clarify, or put a new light on a situation that had been bothering us for some time.

What happens in this meeting is that two holy natures connect with each other, and the outcome is joy for each of us. This shows that when we approach each other in a spirit of holiness and kindness, miracles happen, for real. We not only honour them, but honour ourselves as well.

Keeping our word to others, and ourselves, and not permitting ourselves to be bought, are also important attributes of holiness. When we keep our word, our credibility is strengthened, and our character is enhanced. Others can depend on us to do what we said we would, and when we deliver, we contribute to the satisfaction of a fellow human being.

And not allowing ourselves to have a price, in the social market, adds to our stature as a dignified human person, with ethical and moral principles, which cannot be breached. Our character and integrity then become exemplary, and others seek to emulate our values.

This is the essence of a holy life worth having, and worth living too. We then become aware that earth is really in heaven, and heaven is really on earth.

Pic Oliver Mills

 

Oliver Mills is a former lecturer in education at the University of the West Indies Mona Campus. He holds an M.Ed degree. from Dalhousie University in Canada, an MA from the University of London and a post-graduate diploma in HRM and Training, University of Leicester. He is a past Permanent Secretary in Education with the government of the Turks and Caicos Islands