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EU could slap sanctions on UK in border row ‘the UK is playing poker’

THE EU could threaten the UK with sanctions or a closed border over a fierce grace-period extension row.

European law professor Francesco Rizzuto warned the EU could be forced to react to Britain if the grace period goes on for too long. The UK unilaterally decided to extend a grace period in border regulations to allow easier trade between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK. However, by doing this the EU has insisted the UK has breached the Brexit deal and threatened legal action.

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While speaking on RT with Bill Dod, Professor Rizzuto argued the EU could implement tough checks at the Northern Ireland and Ireland border.

Mr. Dod said: “What can the EU do?

“There is talk of slapping sanctions on the UK?”

Mr. Rizzuto replied: “Well, I suppose it could end up in that sort of situation but then it would be pretty pointless.

DON’T MISS: Lord Frost hails Brexit freedom in fierce Lord Adonis shuts down

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EU to threaten UK with new checks if Boris fails to stand down on grace period extension (Image: GETTY)

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The EU could threaten the EU with sanctions or a closed border over a fierce grace-period extension row. (Image: GETTY)

“I think the UK is playing a game of poker here.

“This is because quite clearly if the UK unilaterally continues with this extension, of course, the UK is arguing circumstances but if it pushes for this six months, eight months or 10 months it will force the EU to do something at the border.

“This will be done to stop what the EU is afraid of, to stop goods coming into the EU by the backdoor.”

Former Brexit negotiator Lord David Frost on Wednesday insisted the UK Government was committed to defending Britain against the EU. 

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EU news: While speaking on RT with Bill Dod, Professor Rizzuto argued the EU could implement tough checks at the Northern Ireland and Ireland border. (Image: GETTY)

Boris Johnson on Brexit trade deal ‘teething problems’

Lord Frost said: “These measures are lawful and consistent with the progressive and good faith interpretation of the Northern Ireland Protocol.”

Lord Frost was supported by Lord Caine who insisted the EU was behaving hysterically. 

He said: “Does my noble friend agree that the somewhat hysterical reaction of the EU demonstrates yet again their one-sided inability to recognize legitimate unionist concerns and to see the Belfast agreement through?

“This is an agreement that their intransigence now threatens to undermine.

READ MORE:

UK economy: Inflation could rise ‘sharply’ in blow to Sunak [INSIGHT]
EU divided: Sweden and Denmark ‘hid behind UK’ before bloc concern [ANALYSIS]
Emmanuel Macron cried support for Sturgeon’s independence dream [INSIGHT]

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EU news: Former Brexit negotiator Lord David Frost on Wednesday insisted the UK Government was committed to defending Britain against the EU. (Image: PTV)

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“Can the noble friend assure me he will robustly defend any legal action brought by the EU and that this unionist Government will take whatever measures are necessary to guarantee Northern Ireland’s place as an integral part of the UK internal market?”

Lord Frost replied: “We will, of course, consider very carefully any legal process launched by the EU. We will defend our position vigorously.

“The protocol is explicit in respecting the territorial integrity of the UK and we will ensure that is sustained.”

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Senators come together to make daylight saving time permanent

Senators come together to make daylight saving time permanent

Reprint

Sarah K. Burris – March 09, 2021

Senators come together to make daylight saving time permanent

Marco Rubio (MSNBC/Screenshot)

Year after year, particularly in the spring and fall Americans lament Daylight Saving Time, an antiquated way of adjusting the time to help preserve as much light as possible. Many believe it was due to the U.S. agrarian society, but according to the History Channel’s factoids, the agriculture industry actually opposed it.

Germany was the first country to implement the idea on April 30, 1916, and the U.S. first did it in 1918, with Congress attempting to repeal it in 1919.

“Rather than rural interests, it has been urban entities such as retail outlets and recreational businesses that have championed daylight saving over the decades,” said History.com. Tired of ads? Want to support our progressive journalism? Click to learn more.

Sens. Marco Rubio (R-FL), James Lankford (R-OK), Roy Blunt (R-MO), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), Ron Wyden (D-OR), Cindy Hide-Smith (R-MS), Rick Scott (R-FL), and Ed Markey (D-MA) are all endorsing the Sunshine Protection Act, according to a release. Fifteen states have changed their Daylight Saving Time rules and dozens more are also considering doing it. States include Arkansas, Alabama, California, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

The time was once isolated to just a few states, but now that there are more states it can create more confusion. The growing list of states is causing more problems as Americans start traveling again and have no idea whether a state is observing the time change or not.

See the release below:

Image

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A man holding the Oxford vaccine

Covid vaccines cut risk of serious illness by 80% in over-80s

By Nick Triggle and Michelle Roberts
BBC News

Related Topics – Coronavirus pandemic

A man holding the Oxford vaccine

A single shot of either the Oxford-AstraZeneca or the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid jab reduces the chance of needing hospital treatment by more than 80%, an analysis in England shows.

The Public Health England data showed the effect kicked in three to four weeks after vaccination.

It was based on people aged over 80 who were the first to receive the jab.

Government scientists hailed the result, but stressed that two doses were needed for the best protection.

It comes after similar findings were published by Scottish health authorities last week, which they hailed as “spectacular”.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock told a Downing Street briefing on Monday the latest vaccine results were “very strong”.

He added: “They may also help to explain why the number of Covid admissions to intensive care units among people over 80 in the UK have dropped to single figures in the last couple of weeks.”

Also speaking at the news conference, England’s deputy chief medical officer – Prof Jonathan Van-Tam – said the data offered a glimpse of how the vaccine programme “is going to hopefully take us into a very different world in the next few months”.

But he said it was “absolutely critical” that second doses “are still part of the course of immunisation against Covid-19 and no less important”.

Prof Van-Tam stressed there was a “significant likelihood” that a second dose of a vaccine would “mature your immune response, possibly make it broader and almost certainly make it longer than it would otherwise be in relation to a first dose only.”

More than 20 million people in the UK have had their first dose of a vaccine – over a third of the adult population.

Meanwhile, another 104 deaths within 28 days of a positive coronavirus have been reported in the UK, and a further 5,455 new cases, according to the latest figures.

Covid vaccination centre

The PHE data, which has not been peer-reviewed, also suggested the Pfizer vaccine, which started being rolled out a month before the AstraZeneca vaccine, leads to an 83% reduction in deaths from Covid. This was based on people over the age of 80 who had died.

The data also showed vaccination cuts the risk of people over 70 developing any Covid symptoms by around 60%, three weeks after an initial dose.

Prof Van-Tam said the decision to give the AstraZeneca vaccine to older people was “clearly vindicated”.

Some European nations have refused to give it to the over 65s because data from the trials was mainly on its effect among younger adults.

Prof Van-Tam said the judgement made by the UK authorities was that it was simply “not plausible” the vaccine would only work on younger adults.

He said other countries would doubtless be “very interested” in the data coming out of the UK.

Dr. Mary Ramsay, Public Health England’s head of immunisation, said there was growing evidence that the vaccines were working to reduce infections and save lives.

“While there remains much more data to follow, this is encouraging and we are increasingly confident that vaccines are making a real difference,” she said.

However, more evidence is needed to know how well the vaccines protect against the Brazil variant that has recently been identified in the UK.

This variant has a mutation – E484 – that could reduce some of the effectiveness of the vaccines.

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EASTERN CARIBBEAN CENTRAL BANK

V A C A N C Y
Banking Officer II, Eastern Caribbean Central Bank

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East Caribbean Asset Management Corporation – Vacancy

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‘Hybrid working will become the norm’

Woman with ipad

Working from home some of the time, or hybrid working, will become “the norm” for many companies after the pandemic, says global workspace provider IWG.

Firms will be looking to save money and be more environment-friendly by using less office space, said IWG chief executive Mark Dixon.

IWG said 2020 had been a “challenging” year as fewer firms rented its offices.

But it said it was ready to take advantage of “accelerating demand” for hybrid working.

“Something’s happening and it is a change to the way that companies and people work,” Mr. Dixon told the BBC’s Today programme.

The coronavirus crisis hit IWG hard, with waning demand for its services leading to a pre-tax loss of £620m last year, according to newly released results.

But Mr. Dixon pointed to big new deals with major companies as evidence that the company was turning the corner.

On Monday, IWG signed up its biggest customer to date, securing a three-year agreement with Japanese telecoms group NTT to give its 300,000 employees access to IWG’s office network.

Under the terms of the deal, NTT staff will be able to work at any of the 3,300 offices owned by IWG.

In another agreement, Standard Chartered bank’s 95,000 staff were recently given access to IWG offices for the next 12 months on a trial basis.

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‘More time for myself’

Paul Hubble
Paul Hubble spent five hours a day commuting to London from Eastbourne in East Sussex

Paul Hubble used to have to leave his home in Eastbourne, East Sussex, at 06:10 to get to his desk at Barclays’ London headquarters in Canary Wharf by 09:00 – a morning commute of two-and-a-half hours.

He had to leave just before 17:00 if he wanted to make it home for 19:30.

But since home-working became the norm for Barclays employees, Paul says he can get more done.

“I now have more time for myself, but also can be more productive in that I can start work early and finish work later,” he told the BBC. Plus he saves £6,000 a year on his rail season ticket.

It also means he can make time for a mid-afternoon dog walk, which he says is a “great way of recharging the batteries”.

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Mr. Dixon said companies were keen to shed some of their office space and use third-party facilities instead, often closer to where staff actually live.

“It works for companies because it’s a lot cheaper,” he said. “It’s also much, much better for the environment,” he added, as it enabled workers to cut back on commuting.

One big UK employer, the Nationwide building society, has indicated that it does not intend to force people to return to the office if they have been successfully able to work from home during the pandemic.

Its leader of people and culture, Jane Hanson, told the BBC that about two-thirds of its 18,000 employees had been working from home for the past year.

“We won’t be asking them to go back to the office and we’ve given people a commitment at the moment that the current working practices will continue until at least June, whilst we’re working out what the future looks like,” she said.

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Coronavirus vaccine – weekly summary of Yellow Card reporting

Severe Allergy

This advice is that people with a previous history of severe allergic reactions to any ingredients of the vaccine should not receive it. People who receive the vaccine should be monitored for at least 15 minutes afterwards.

The foregoing is taken from the UK Government web site on COVID-19 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-vaccine-adverse-reactions/coronavirus-vaccine-summary-of-yellow-card-reporting

See below the summary of the full version of the above link.

Summary

At the time of this report, more than 120,000 people across the UK have died within 28 days of a positive test for coronavirus (COVID-19). Rates of COVID-19 infection and hospitalisation remain high.

Vaccination is the single most effective way to reduce deaths and severe illness from COVID-19. A national immunisation campaign has been underway since early December 2020.

Two COVID-19 vaccines, Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccines, are currently being used in the UK. Both have been authorised for supply by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) following a thorough review of safety, quality, and efficacy information from clinical trials. In clinical trials, both vaccines showed very high levels of protection against symptomatic infections with COVID-19. We expect data to be available soon on the impact of the vaccination campaign in reducing infections and illness in the UK.

All vaccines and medicines have some side effects. These side effects need to be continuously balanced against the expected benefits in preventing illness.

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine was evaluated in clinical trials involving more than 44,000 participants. The most frequent adverse reactions in trials were pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, myalgia (muscle pains), chills, arthralgia (joint pains), and fever; these were each reported in more than 1 in 10 people. These reactions were usually mild or moderate in intensity and resolved within a few days after vaccination. Adverse reactions were reported less frequently in older adults (over 55 years) than in younger people.

The Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine was evaluated in clinical trials involving more than 23,000 participants. The most frequently reported adverse reactions in these trials were injection-site tenderness, injection-site pain, headache, fatigue, myalgia, malaise, pyrexia (fever), chills, arthralgia, and nausea; these were each reported in more than 1 in 10 people. The majority of adverse reactions were mild to moderate in severity and usually resolved within a few days of vaccination. Adverse reactions reported after the second dose were milder and reported less frequently than after the first dose. Adverse reactions were generally milder and reported less frequently in older adults (65 years and older) than in younger people.

The MHRA’s role is also to continually monitor safety during widespread use of a vaccine. We have in place a proactive strategy to do this. We also work closely with our public health partners in reviewing the effectiveness and impact of the vaccines to ensure the benefits continue to outweigh any possible side effects.

Part of our monitoring role includes reviewing reports of suspected side effects. Any member of the public or health professional can submit suspected side effects through the Yellow Card scheme. The nature of Yellow Card reporting means that reported events are not always proven side effects. Some events may have happened anyway, regardless of vaccination. This is particularly the case when millions of people are vaccinated, and especially when most vaccines are being given to the most elderly people and people who have underlying illness.

This safety update report is based on detailed analysis of data up to 14 February 2021. At this date, an estimated 8.3 million first doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and 6.9 million doses of the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine had been administered, and around 0.6 million second doses, mostly the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, had been administered. This represents an increase of 2.8 million on the previous week.

As of 14 February 2021, for the UK

  • 26,823 Yellow Cards have been reported for the Pfizer/BioNTech
  • 31,427 have been reported for the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine
  • 177 have been reported where the brand of the vaccine was not specified

For both vaccines, the overall reporting rate is around 3 to 5 Yellow Cards per 1,000 doses administered.

In the week since the previous summary for 7 February 2021, we have received a further 2,616 Yellow Cards for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, 10,999 for the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine, and 64 where the brand was not specified. A higher number of doses of the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine were administered in the last week than the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

For both vaccines, the overwhelming majority of reports relate to injection-site reactions (sore arm for example) and generalised symptoms such as ‘flu-like’ illness, headache, chills, fatigue (tiredness), nausea (feeling sick), fever, dizziness, weakness, aching muscles, and rapid heartbeat. Generally, these happen shortly after the vaccination and are not associated with more serious or lasting illness.

These types of reactions reflect the normal immune response triggered by the body to the vaccines. They are typically seen with most types of vaccines and tend to resolve within a day or two. The nature of reported suspected side effects is broadly similar across age groups, although, as was seen in clinical trials and as is usually seen with other vaccines, they may be reported more frequently in younger adults.

Severe allergy

On 9 December 2020, the MHRA issued preliminary guidance on severe allergic reactions after the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine due to early reports of anaphylaxis. Following a further detailed review, this advice was amended on 30 December to the current advice. This advice is that people with a previous history of severe allergic reactions to any ingredients of the vaccine should not receive it. People who receive the vaccine should be monitored for at least 15 minutes afterwards.

Widespread use of the vaccine now suggests that severe allergic reactions to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine are very rare. Anaphylaxis can also be a very rare side effect associated with most other vaccines.

Following very substantial exposure across the UK population, no other new safety concerns have been identified from reports received so far.

Conclusion

  • The increases in the number of ADR reports reflects the increase in vaccine deployment as new vaccination centres have opened across the UK
  • The number and nature of suspected adverse reactions reported so far are not unusual in comparison to other types of routinely used vaccines
  • The overall safety experience with both vaccines is so far as expected from the clinical trials
  • Based on current experience, the expected benefits of both COVID-19 vaccines in preventing COVID-19 and its serious complications far outweigh any known side effects
  • As with all vaccines and medicines, the safety of COVID-19 vaccines is being continuously monitored

Further information on the type of suspected adverse reactions (ADRs) reported for the COVID-19 mRNA Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca is provided in Annex 1. It is important to read the guidance notes to ensure appropriate interpretation of the data.

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Premier Taylor-Farrell’s 15-year time-frame for economic independence

Part 01/2020 (Contribution)
January 24, 2020

What can we do to move beyond 60% dependency on the UK for our recurrent budget?

BRADES, Montserrat, January 17, 2020 – In his Monday, January 13th opening remarks for the annual DfID Financial Aid Mission (FAM), Montserrat’s new premier, Hon Mr Easton Taylor-Farrell, announced a policy goal that by 2035 (i.e. in fifteen years), Montserrat should be able to pay its own way. That is, he hopes that by that time our economy will have grown sufficiently strong through tourism, trade and investment that we will no longer need the current 60% UK subsidy to carry our recurrent budget; without, over-burdening our economy through over-taxation.
What would that take?

For one, Government and our economy are largely continuous (never mind what politicians tend to say around election time). So, let’s look at a January 2017 article in this series:
“[I]f we are to soundly rebuild Montserrat’s economy we need to soundly understand what happened to us. This makes the December 15, 2017, Mott-MacDonald Draft Economic Growth Strategy document[1] doubly important. Here, let us look at an adjusted version of one of their tables, with some additional calculations:

[ . . . ]

[Due to the volcano crisis and UK aid under the UN Charter, Article 73, the public sector has more than doubled as a percent of our economy, moving from 19.3% in 1994 to 45.8% in 2016 . . .

As a result, our GDP is not a “natural” one driven by a buoyant private sector, it reflects this annual support to our economy. Such is not sustainable

In simple terms, if we are to return the . . . public sector to being 20% of our economy in 20 years, our economy would have to more than double, from EC$153 million to EC$ 350 million . . . this requires an average growth rate of 4.2%.

So, it is reasonable for Mott-MacDonald to target a 3 – 5% annual GDP growth rate. ECCB would prefer to see 5 – 7%.

However, if Montserrat is to move ahead, we must put in place key infrastructure, build our productive capacity,[4] provide incentives and reassurance that will rebuild investor confidence, and support a wave of enterprises that take advantage of our major opportunities: tourism, geothermal energy, the rising global digital services economy, and the like.[5]”

Of course, to do that in fifteen years instead, we would have to grow even faster, 5.7% on average.

What about tourism (and the digital sector)?

That is a bit complicated. As, while we can see that we are surrounded by several islands with 600,000 and more tourists per year, so there is obvious room for growth, in the longer term, the main-spring of global economic growth is shifting to Asia.

As this series noted on July 5th 2018, “China and India . . . combined will contribute over forty percent of global economic growth this year, 3.3%.  By contrast, the UK contributes only 1.4% and the US only 12.3% to current global growth.  By 2023, the UK may contribute 1.3% and the US, 8.5%.”

Where, “Chinese and Indian tourists will find it far more convenient to go to neighbouring destinations, instead of regularly flying to the Caribbean. So while slow-growth Europe and North America will still be prosperous and will be sources for tourism, the North Atlantic Basin is gradually turning into a low-growth, already-been-there, saw-that, got-the-tee-shirt, mostly cruise-ship visitor driven tourism market. So, it would be a mistake to put all of our economic eggs in the tourism basket. Yes, tourism is indeed Montserrat’s fastest “quick win” driver for growth, but we have to be realistic about setting up our strategic moves beyond tourism.”

That points to the digital sector, and to the significance of the sub-sea, terabit per second class fibre optic cable project, for which the contract was signed by former premier Romeo on October 24th – which is why we just saw a visit by RV Ridley Thomas, which surveyed the proposed route for the cable. We can catch a glimpse into the significance of this by eavesdropping on what St Helena is saying about their own fibre optic cable. As TMR recently reported:
“According to the Government of St Helena, ‘[c]onnecting to Equiano meets SHG’s timing and budgetary requirements for the European Development Fund and supports the Digital ICT Strategy for St Helena.’

According to their Financial Secretary, Mr Dax Richards: ‘[s]ignificant additional economic development on St Helena is conditional on improved connectivity and accessibility, and therefore the delivery of the Fibre Project is crucial to economic growth . . . The delivery of the Fibre Project is a key action in the Sustainable Economic Development Plan – in order to develop the satellite ground stations, financial services, work from home, academia research and conferences, film location and tourism sectors.’”
All of this calls for long-term, consensus based national strategic planning. Such should build on the Mott-McDonald Economic Growth Strategy (EGS) that was recently shepherded through by consultant economist Mr Raja Kadri, on the 2008 – 2020 Sustainable Development Plan, the current 10-year Physical Development Plan, the past two energy policies and other similar initiatives.

Perhaps, it would also be helpful to again look at the SWOT chart for the EGS, as a reminder that a balanced growth framework has been put on the table for over a year now, through a process of national consultation:

Perhaps, then, a very good place to begin building on the foundation that is already in place would be with the successor Sustainable Development Plan, which is technically due this year. (It may be wise to extend the current SDP for a year or so, to give us time to build its successor.)

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These are serious times

These are serious times

January 24, 2020 – seemingly never published online

Several Montserrat general elections have taken place within the last three months in a year, some of them in November. Perhaps because the festival time is usually around the corner and the joyousness of Christmas, while not so for some, helps to remove the concern of the complaints and promises made by the winning party especially if it was a new or an opposition party that won the elections.

This last general election took place only five weeks away from Christmas and while a few years back most Ministers would pay to publish Christmas and New Year messages, only the Premier on a few occasions have done so, while for quite some time also the Governors Christmas messages are a rarity. Jus wonderin why this is so. some say “it is because you write ‘bad’ about them. Sad eh!

So the year ended and the new one began with the new MCAP government under its victorious five-some have been spending time feeling their way around with pronouncements as to their intentions or ‘rejections’ of already ‘growth’ plans, still evident when the Premier joined in the ‘friendly’ Financial Aid Mission budgetary and ‘capital’ discussions.

Early this week, there appeared in a message this bit: I will not accept a mediocre cultural standard for Montserrat… not in insurance, not in steel band music, not in the rebuilding of a commercial and government centre, not in architecture, and certainly not in land development.” With it was an excellent youtube video of a steel orchestra band performance out of St. Vincent. So the message continued, “Every other island people play steel band music better than Montserratians.

The message prompted a response of agreement. “…our problems or needs are many, many… where is the roadmap? There was one latest 2008. Something was developed from that with changes and confinement – we know what happened! Then, the ignore and a kind of one (development) 2018 (which I didn’t read but a few lines before I got disgusted… now not a word about any of those but for the puny rhetoric that is already coming.
Who is willing to get ‘on board’ to stem the silent sufferings and quiet criticisms of ‘seemingly going nowhere’? We need to hear from our own rather than FCO/DFID what those challenges, and opportunities they refer to. It is only when those are realised, discerned, and understood that the pie in the sky hope of monies from wherever is not as easy as said.

This pretense, ‘we have to believe that is all it is,’ that especially now that Montserrat has some fairy waiting to wave a wand, rather than engaging the UK NOW as they wait on us to tell them what we see as our way forward.

Adam Pile the FCO man during the FAM press conference, “we’ve been talking to different parts of the Montserrat and government asking some quite difficult questions…but how we’re ready for the challenges and opportunities we…trying to get an understanding of the challenges people are facing and Montserrat the opportunities coming around the corner. (See the lead story in this issue on the FAM talks).

Take this and remember this from the new UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson. He spelled out his thinking over foreign aid, telling the Financial Times that if “Global Britain” is going to achieve its “full and massive potential” then we must bring back the Department for International Development (DfID) to the Foreign Office. “We can’t keep spending huge sums of British taxpayers’ money as though we were some independent Scandinavian NGO.” As we now know that is already happening, with DFID and FCO. A group of important UKG officials suggested aid should “do more to serve the political and commercial interests” of Britain.

From The Guardian: “That report “called for the closure of DfID as a separate department and argued the UK should be free to define its aid spending, unconstrained by criteria set by external organisations.” It went on to assert that DfID’s purpose “should be expanded from poverty reduction to include ‘the nation’s overall strategic goals’,” and that “the Foreign Office should incorporate both DfID and the trade department.” Which, is precisely what has been put on the table.”

We believe Adam Pile who was reasonably frank in his answers to our questions at the press conference has sounded these to the Premier, his Ministers, and senior public servant officials in ‘friendly’ discussions.
The following is taken from an article By Benito Wheatley As the BVI celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Great March of 1949. “The miraculous economic transformation of the society from an agrarian economy to a premier tourist destination and international financial centre (IFC) would not have occurred without the granting of greater authority to the local Government over the islands’ affairs.”

Seriously, is Montserrat ready or even thinking about it to take that plunge?

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UK government reports over 240 deaths shortly after coronavirus vaccination

by: Ramon Tomey – February 24, 2021

Tags: AstraZeneca, badhealth, badmedicine, badscience, Big Pharma, BioNTech, coronavirus vaccine, covid-19 pandemic, Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, Pfizer, United Kingdom, Vaccine deaths, vaccine injury, vaccine safety, vaccine wars, Wuhan coronavirus, Yellow Card reports

Image: UK government reports over 240 deaths shortly after coronavirus vaccination

(Natural News) The U.K. government reported that more than 240 people have died shortly after getting the Wuhan coronavirus vaccines. British citizens who died after vaccination reportedly obtained either the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine or the AstraZeneca jab. These vaccine candidates were approved by the British regulator and subsequently used in mass vaccination efforts. Despite this, the U.K. government said it does not believe that the inoculations are to blame for the deaths.

In an extensive report released on Feb. 11, the U.K. government detailed all the adverse reactions reported by both medical personnel and COVID-19 vaccine recipients themselves. The report’s scope included all cases between early December 2020 and the end of January 2021.

According to the release, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) received 143 adverse reaction reports attributed to the Pfizer/BioNTech jab. The AstraZeneca vaccine made in partnership with the University of Oxford reported 90 adverse reactions. There were three reactions where the vaccine brand was not mentioned. Furthermore, a total of eight miscarriages were reported following COVID-19 vaccination – five for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and three for the AstraZeneca candidate.

To further monitor vaccine safety alongside mass immunization efforts, the MHRA introduced a Yellow Card Scheme to collect reports of any suspected side effects. More than 20,000 Yellow Card reports were linked to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. On the other hand, the AstraZeneca jab rolled out last Jan. 4 had 11,748 Yellow Card reports. Seventy-two Yellow Card reports did not specify the brand of the vaccine.

Elderly people or those with underlying conditions made up the majority of the reports. However, the government said either of the vaccines did not play a role in the fatalities based on a review of individual reports and reporting patterns.

The report mentioned that for both vaccines, an overwhelming majority reported reactions at the injection site such as sore arms and generalized symptoms. These generalized symptoms included headache, chills, fatigue, fever, dizziness, and muscle aches. These happen shortly following the vaccination and are not associated with more serious illnesses. However, “spontaneous adverse reactions associated with anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions” were also reported – 130 for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and 30 for the AstraZeneca jab.

Pfizer/BioNTech jab linked to vaccination deaths in other countries

According to the report, more than 9.2 million first doses of the COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in the U.K.’s four constituent countries. Meanwhile, 494,209-second doses have been administered in the four areas. (Related: UK to deploy “resuscitation facilities” in coronavirus vaccination centers to treat wave of allergic reactions caused by vaccines.)

The U.K. is not the only country that has reported fatalities following COVID-19 vaccination. A number of medical personnel also died after getting vaccinated against the Wuhan coronavirus – most notably with the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Florida obstetrician Dr. Gregory Michael died in January after getting inoculated with the first Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine dose. The 56-year-old received his first dose on Dec. 18, but small spots appeared on his hands and feet three days after immunization. He then visited the emergency room of his workplace, Mount Sinai Medical Center, where he was confined. Doctors then found out that the obstetrician had zero blood platelets.

Despite undergoing transfusions to restore his platelet count, it did little for Michael. He eventually suffered a stroke and died as he was set to undergo a last-minute surgical procedure. Michael’s wife Heidi Neckelmann said: “In my mind, his death was 100 percent linked to the vaccine. There is no other explanation.”

Meanwhile, in Portugal, health worker Sonia Acevedo died just a mere two days after getting the COVID-19 jab. The 41-year-old mother of two who worked at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology (IPO) in Porto did not report any adverse effects after immunization. Acevedo was among more than 500 Porto IPO staff who were vaccinated against COVID-19 using the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Sonia’s father Abilio Acevedo said his daughter “was okay” and had no health problems. “She had the COVID-19 vaccine, but she didn’t have any symptoms,” he remarked. Abilio continued that he and his daughter even ate together on New Year’s Eve, not knowing that it would be the last time he would see her alive. He subsequently received a call informing him that Sonia was found dead the morning of Jan. 1. “My daughter left home and I never saw her alive again,” he lamented.

Sonia’s daughter Vania Figueredo meanwhile said that her mother had only complained about the “normal” discomfort in the injection site. Figueredo added that aside from this complaint, her mother felt fine. (Related: Nurse aide dies after receiving work-mandated coronavirus vaccine shot.)

Visit VaccineDeaths.com to find out more news about fatalities caused by the Wuhan coronavirus jabs.

Sources include:

LifeSiteNews.com; Gov.uk; DailyMail.co.uk 1; DailyMail.co.uk 2

Posted in Business/Economy/Banking, COVID-19, Featured, Features, Health, International, Local, News, Regional, Science/Technology0 Comments

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