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New policy aims to get teenage mothers back in school

New policy aims to get teenage mothers back in school

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Jun. 19, CMC – The Ministry of Education has implemented a  new policy  to ensure that  teenage mothers have the opportunity to go back to school while receiving support at home and from their community.

The policy manual was handed over on Monday  by officials from the Ministry and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

The policy which is a collaboration between the Ministry of Education and UNICEF, also had the input of other stakeholders, including the Ministry of Public Security and faith-based organisations.

Sandra Granger

Addressing the handing over ceremony at the National Center for Educational Resource Development (NCERD) , First Lady, Sandra Granger, called on the policy-makers and educators to uphold and protect the rights of children and adolescent mothers who have suffered sexual abuse.

“We have to speak of these things and see it as violence against our children. We also have to… ensure that their rights are recognised and upheld; that our legal and our social protection agencies protect these children with the full majesty of the law… the children come first and it is their future that we have to ensure… That is enshrined in our Constitution.”

According to Minister of Education, Nicolette Henry, teenage pregnancy is a complex issue which results from a number of factors. These can be poverty, gender inequality, violence, lack of education and difficult relationships with parents and family members. She said this must not prevent them from acquiring education.

“As the government, our motto is that every child matters. With this policy there will be no need to repeat the past because the future for adolescent mothers in Guyana will become bright because legally the barriers that prevail will be a thing of the past and indeed illegal. Leaving the path open to an education for all,” Minister Henry told officials present.

UNICEF representative to Guyana and Suriname, Sylvie Fouet said Guyana ranks the second highest in teenage pregnancy in Latin America and the Caribbean. She said the creation of the policy is a key milestone and the next step is implementation. She signalled that opening the doors is not sufficient, and communities and stakeholders need to understand and be supportive and knowledgeable of reproductive health in Guyana.

“They need to know that they are protected and they are cared for so all the supportive mechanisms like education, health and justice has to support that and we hope so and we wish the best for Guyanese particularly the youngest,” Fouet said.

The policy has been in the works for approximately one year and sets out clear guidelines to ensure that mothers are not denied the opportunity to re-enter the formal school system, to continue their education.

It aims at not only managing the reintegration of the adolescent mothers but it is to also advance the prevention of adolescent pregnancy.

Posted in Education, Health, International, Local, News, Regional, Youth0 Comments

Caribbean American Congresswoman outraged over separation of children from parents at US border

Caribbean American Congresswoman outraged over separation of children from parents at US border

By Nelson A. King

NEW YORK, Jun. 18,   CMC – Caribbean American Congresswoman Yvette D. Clarke has joined intensified outrage in the United States over the Trump administration’s decision to separate migrant children from their parents at the US border. 

“There is no act lower than ripping innocent children from the arms of their mothers,” said Clarke, the daughter of Jamaican immigrants, in an  interview with the Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC), on Sunday.

Yvette D. Clarke

“We have hit an all-time low as a people and a country,” added the representative for the 9th Congressional District in Brooklyn. “It is one of the most inhumane, cruel acts that could ever be taken by the Trump administration.

“As a second generation American, the daughter of Jamaican immigrant parents,  I take these assaults on immigrant communities personally,” Clarke continued, stating that she has been “a staunch advocate for immigration rights, from fighting for a clean Dream Act, aggressively advocating to keep families together to keeping vulnerable children with their parents, and fighting the Trump administration on their revocation of DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] and attacks on Diversity Visas.”

In addressing what she described as “the racist, xenophobia of the Trump Administration,” Clarke said she has also advocated for the ASPIRE Act, a bipartisan bill to provide individuals who have received Temporary Protective Status (TPS), legal permanent residency.

“This administration has no bounds, even children don’t seem to matter,” the congresswoman said. “Therefore, I vow to continue to fight ferociously, along with my colleagues, against these grave injustices; and, we don’t plan to stop until justice prevails.”

Amid the profound outrage, US President Donald J. Trump on Saturday reiterated what political analysts and observers say is his erroneous claim that Democrats were responsible for his administration’s policy of separating migrant families arrested at the US border.

“Democrats can fix their forced family breakup at the Border by working with Republicans on new legislation, for a change!” said Trump in a twitter post on the weekend.

On Friday, the Trump administration announced that close to 2,000 children were separated from their migrant parents in a six-week period, concluding in May, as part of its “zero tolerance” policy on immigration.

In expressing outrage over the Trump administration’s new policy, Democrats have said that the separation of children from their parents at the US border is just of the incumbent administration’s making – that they had not enacted any law or rule in that regard.

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Contestants at Ethel Fashion Show April 12

Eight Caribbean beauties in NY beauty pageant

 

 

 

According to Yvonne Peters, the Vincentian-born president and founder of the Brooklyn-based organizing group, Caribbean American Cultural Group, Inc., the contestants hail from Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, Haiti, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The contestants are: Reality Dopwell (Miss Belize); Breana Maxwell (Miss Jamaica); Shanah Forbes (Miss Jamaica); Jamela (Miss Guyana); Maya Grant (Miss Kingstown, St. Vincent); Kaiia Krysta Phillips (Miss Greggs, St. Vincent); Makeda Peters (Miss St Vincent & the Grenadines); and Kimberly Thomas (Miss Haiti).

Peters said the contestants will be judged on swim wear, talent, evening wear and interview.

She said the contestants’ platforms include awareness of sexual assaults on college campuses and Title IX; awareness of rape culture among high school youths; depression and suicide; combating poverty; and building self-esteem in children and youths.

Contestants at Ethel Fashion Show April 12

“Over a period of approximately four months, these young ladies are transformed into pageant contestants through various workshops, such as building a foundation for success, modeling, swimwear show case, talent show case, interviews, communication training, pageantry and dance rehearsals,” she said.

Peters said she founded the pageant in 2010 because she “always wanted to help the young people, in particular young women, in my community and give them a sense of purpose, community involvement and empowerment.

“So, the idea of a cultural pageant materialized; and, years later, we are still going strong, empowering young women to be confident in themselves and become leaders in their communities,” she said. Peters said the venue has a capacity of 1,200.

“So, we looking forward to a well-attended event for family-fun evening,” the pageant coordinator said. “We invite everyone to come out and support this community-building event, support the young people of our community and have some fun.”

Doors open at 5:00 p.m.; showtime: 6:00 p.m. sharp.

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Campaign to combat childhood obesity launched

Campaign to combat childhood obesity launched

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Jun 15, CMC – Barbados has launched a campaign aimed at addressing childhood obesity and the government has said it is examining the feasibility of restricting foods high in salt, fat and sugar from the school environment and from being marketed to children.

Health and Wellness Minister, retired Lieutenant Colonel Jeffrey Bostic, speaking at the launch of the Childhood Obesity Prevention Campaign, cited a report by researchers at the University of the West Indies (UWI) showing that in 1987, only 8.5 per cent of Barbadian school children were obese.

However, by 2010, the percentage rose to 32.5 per cent and it is now projected that the figure could increase to 50 per cent by 2030.

“Childhood obesity is harming Barbados through its impacts on the health and social fabric of the country. Not only is the burden of obesity in children large but it is projected to continue growing unless we take decisive action,” Bostic said.

He said that the impacts of childhood obesity on health encompassed issues such as increased risk of adult obesity and increased risk of non-communicable diseases, depression and anxiety.

The campaign, an initiative of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Barbados, and dubbed “Stop! Yuh TOO Sweet,” will initially focus solely on the support of policy change to ban the sale of sugary sweets in schools.

Bostic gave the assurance that the government was committed to addressing the issue in several ways including working in partnership with a variety of agencies.

Other initiatives include promoting breastfeeding as an integral part of early child nutrition; supporting the monitoring of growth and development in early childhood; and encouraging regular physical activity in school-aged children.

He said that the Ministry would be engaging the food industry on reducing the production, manufacture, distribution and marketing of energy-dense and high-salt foods.

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The Challenge of Change

The needed radical reform of our Civil Service

Has our Civil Service persistently failed to be “fit for purpose” in post-volcano crisis Montserrat? (And, what is that “purpose”?)

BRADES, Montserrat– A few years ago, former Governor Elizabeth Carriere put on the table the question as to whether our Civil Service is “fit for purpose.”

Doubtless, just to mention this means feathers are already ruffled and hackles are rising in powerful circles. The same circles that – on fair comment – have too often tried to sideline or lock out or push out positive change agents[1] or even anyone with the temerity to raise such matters by “speaking truth to power” in our independent media. And of course, such pesky radical gadflies are obvious targets for hitmen to slander, spread gossip on, mock and make into scapegoats!

Guess what: that reaction is a sign that Miss Carriere’s concern was and is on target.

So, instead of shooting down the unwelcome messenger,  let us see how we can soberly and soundly deal with a hardy perennial problem, from the roots to the seeds that keep on bringing up new generations of thorny kusha.

If you doubt that this is a serious matter, simply take note that we are now on the third generation – “phase” – of a major public sector reform initiative.  Of course, we have changed the name; openly saying “phase three” obviously means that phases I and II did not do what was hoped.

A few weeks back, TMR listed the bits and pieces we must put together to get:

“CRITICAL MASS FOR TRANSFORMATIONAL STRATEGIC CHANGE

1: Identifying, encouraging, developing and supporting good change ideas, their originators and champions.

2: Providing sponsorship and incubators that get change initiatives to the point where they can break through to undeniable success. (That’s what the PMO was supposed to be, bringing to bear world class training, certification and organisation as well as management through the Axelos system, starting with PRINCE2.)

3: Providing Godfather support at top level, with marshals on call to deal with hitmen sent out to destructively undermine change and discredit change agents. (Responsible critics actually help the change process.)

4: Organising an agreed programme of strategic change initiatives with a timeline and designated expediters responsible to break through roadblocks.

5: Similarly, upgrading transparency, accountability and financial systems to provide confidence in the quality of governance.

6: To foster this, there should be joint oversight by a commission of GoM and UKG representatives.”

If we don’t meet that standard, predictably strategic change efforts will fail. Indeed, the Montserrat Development Corporation (MDC) was intended to be just such a well-backed incubator and catalyst for change.  But, if your change initiative is dogged by top-level capacity problems and is captured by the prevailing poorly performing organisation culture and its big frogs,[2] it will also fail. So, let us remember, DfID’s verdict in the 2012 EC$ 5+ million MDC rescue package business case was: failure.[3] In a DfID-sponsored Business Environment Review report, they gave some telling further points[4]“the  MDC  was  terminated following  poor performance  and concerns over management of money, as evidenced by the findings and recommendations of a Task Force review of the MDC in March 2015.” Similarly, DfID’s November 2014 health care improvement project review pointed to[5]gaps in GoM’s project management capacity.

Whether we agree with DfID or not makes little difference: we are seeing pointers to what our principal aid partner thinks, on long and frustrated experience – they are who we have to convince.  The same frustrations led our last Governor to challenge our civil service’s fitness for purpose. And many people across our community will agree that on the whole our Government Departments are not working up to efficient standard. We clearly have a long, rocky row to hoe.

To start, basic civics 101: our Civil Service is not the main arm of Government and it is not the main centre of legitimate power.  We live in a constitutional democracy, and so every three to five years, dozens of people go out door to door and stand on public platforms to face and be assessed by the voting public and the media. Nine of these are elected as our representatives and the platform of the majority sets the political and policy agenda for government. Meeting as the Legislative Assembly, these representatives publicly debate and pass our laws, including our Budgets. Cabinet serves as the executive committee of this Legislature and is accountable to it. Civil Service Ministries, Departments, Offices, Permanent Secretaries, Department Heads and staff – none of which are directly accountable to the people – all serve to facilitate and support that executive arm of our parliament.

Next, no, the Civil Service is not the “permanent government” that puts up with “those elected idiots” for a few years while its senior officers get on with their own business as usual agenda. Instead, its officers should serve the current government capably and ethically, in such a way that they may equally serve the next one and the one after that. Including, when it comes to time to challenge unsound policy based on thorough, sound analysis. In short, a politicised, low capability, self-serving Civil Service undermines its credibility.

Yes, there is continuity in government (which is a key civil Service role), but also there must be genuine self-assessment, review, accountability, partnership with the public, transparency, reform and change – especially in a day when rapid change is itself a driving force. Likewise, if the Civil Service builds a reputation for roadblocks, undue delays, lack of effective performance, poor customer service, laziness, needless delay in payment, doing their private or personal business on Government time, corrupt under the table dealings and more, it is not fit for purpose.

No, shattering the Cabinet-approved Programme Management Office by frog-marching its head out of Government Headquarters on a “no cause clause” dismissal[6] then delaying a replacement for almost a year has not removed the need for a strategic initiatives unit with world class programme based project cycle management capacity.[7] Likewise, dragging out or frustrating reform initiatives or recruitment of key strategic posts or undermining and poisoning people against needed technical cooperation officers has not eliminated the capacity gaps we face. 

Yes, we need a policy level round table where month by month the PS’es and HoD’s meet with the Cabinet and its executive officers to account for progress and gaps on the agreed timeline for the portfolio of critically important transformational projects. Meet, to make decisions on how to expedite the key projects.

And, more.

For, in the end, it is we of Montserrat who must work together with one heart and mind, to create economic self-sufficiency over the next ten to twenty years.

[1]           See TMR: https://www.themontserratreporter.com/head-of-pmo-dismissed-without-cause-the-premier-laments/

[2]           SeeTMR: https://www.themontserratreporter.com/de-ole-dawg-part-19-2017-the-caribbeans-tainted-leadership-challenge/

[3]           See the DfID 2012 MDC Business Case, esp. p. 4:  http://iati.dfid.gov.uk/iati_documents/4158833.odt

[4]           See DfID’s BERF report, p. 1: http://www.businessenvironmentreform.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/BERF-Montserrat-BE-Capacity-Building_FINAL_31Jan2017.pdf

[5]               See TMR, https://www.themontserratreporter.com/de-ole-dawg-part-4-2018-montserrats-project-governance-challenge/

[6]           See TMR: https://www.themontserratreporter.com/de-ole-dawg-part-22-2017-failing-the-opportunity-test/

[7]           See TMR: https://www.themontserratreporter.com/de-ole-dawg-part-13-2017-prince2-and-moving-towards-an-economy-transformation-programme/

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Marcia Gilbert-Roberts (left) and Eric Khant sig ning MOU (JIS Photo)

Jamaica signs MOU with United States to combat child trafficking

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Jun 1, CMC – The United States is providing US$4.5 million in funding for projects and other activities over the next four years under an agreement with signed with Jamaica  for a Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership, which is aimed at combating the trafficking of children here.

Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Marcia Gilbert-Roberts, who signed the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Chargé d’Affaires at the United States Embassy here, Eric Khant, said that the objective of the partnership is to save Jamaican children and at-risk youth from being trafficked.

Marcia Gilbert-Roberts (left) and Eric Khant sig ning MOU (JIS Photo)

“One of the most valuable assets for the future of any country is its young people – our children. We are pleased, therefore, that Jamaica was invited by the Government of the United States to participate in this project,” she told the signing ceremony on Thursday.

She said that the MoU signing represents another milestone in the relationship between the two countries, noting that ‘without partnerships of this kind, our journey towards achieving our targets under the sustainable development goals and Vision 2030 would certainly be more extensive and arduous”.

Khant said Washington is pleased to be partnering with Jamaica on this initiative, and stressed that human trafficking is a very serious offence which must be eliminated.

“Approximately 2.5 million people are victims of human trafficking every year and many of those victims are children. This type of modern-day slavery should not exist in our society…because of that, we work closely with our international partners to fight this heinous crime, and we’re delighted that we can now partner with Jamaica under this Child Protection Compact Partnership.”

He said the four-year agreement will help to strengthen Jamaica’s ability to prosecute and punish traffickers, identify and provide comprehensive services to victims and prevent these crimes from happening.

“Our hope is that together, we will be able to eliminate child trafficking altogether in Jamaica and the wider region,” he added.

Jamaica is the fourth country to have been selected for a CPC Partnership and the first country from the Caribbean region. The others are Ghana, Peru and the Philippines.

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Rescue teams at scene of accident (Photo courtesy Tribune Newspaper)

Four killed, several others injured, as truck slams into Labour Day parade

NASSAU, Bahamas, Jun 1, CMC – At least four people were killed and 24 others injured after a truck slammed into people celebrating Labour Day activities here on Friday, police said.

Eyewitnesses said the unoccupied truck rolled down the street, hitting several people as it picked up speed. It later crashed into another vehicle, pinning an individual between the two vehicles.

Rescue teams at scene of accident (Photo courtesy Tribune Newspaper)

Video pictures of the accident show people screaming for someone to move the truck.

Police said two women died on the scene and two others died in hospital.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Kendal Strachan said the vehicle rolled on after the driver, who is assisting in the investigations came out of the vehicle.

“ … it went forward colliding first with a child along the side of the street, then descending the hill, continuing north running into several persons who were participating in the Labour Day parade along the eastern side of East Street, coming to rest against a Nissan Micra and the building just at that intersection,” he said.

Labour Minister Dion Foulkes told a news conference that “this is a difficult thing.

“A parade of that nature is normally stop and go at not more than five mph (for vehicles). Constantly on these parades you would find police officers asking persons who are on the vehicles to be properly seated within the vehicles. Yes there are large trucks on the parade where persons are standing but we don’t want to see persons hanging off the side of the vehicle,” he added.

He said the incident sent shockwaves throughout the country but also showcased quick and effective work from health professionals who worked to prevent a rise in the death toll.

“Today is an extremely sad day for the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,” said Health Minister Dr Duane Sands.

“Having endured such a tragic incident, the one thing I can say is from the time of the incident doctors, nurses responded even in their grief to care for the victims. The EMS staff, nursing staff, physicians at PMH made their country proud today and they provided care with a level of professionalism.”

The parade was cancelled following the incident.

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Rice in Guyana

Guyana recording increased revenue for rice shipment so far this year

GEORGETOWN, Guyana, May 12, CMC –Guyana exported just over 139,000 tonnes of rice during the first four months of the year, valued at more than US$57 million, a senior official of the Guyana Rice Development Board (GRDB) has said.

GRDB manager, Nizam Hassan said that as of May 7, the rice industry has harvested 86 per cent of its 2018 production, equivalent to 75,137 hectares of the 87,538 hectares planted and is a significant increase in production from 310,748 tonnes earlier in the year to 448,926 tonnes.

Rice in Guyana“For the period January to April 2018, we exported 139,501 tonnes valued at US$57.7 million compared to 120,811 tonnes valued at US$47 million for the corresponding period of 2017.

“So, I’m talking about the first four months of 2018 compared with the first four months of 2017, in terms of the volume, that’s about 15 per cent more we’ve exported. The increases in the exports have primarily come of course from new markets that we’ve been exporting to,” Hassan said.

He said “what we have seen in the first crop, generally there has been improved productivity issues such as pests and disease were managed, farmers were being paid faster than previous crops, prices paid were improved from previous crops, as GUY $3000 (One Guyana dollar=US$0.004 cents) per bag of paddy.

“The first crop faired very well and we are very optimistic going ahead for the second crop. This kind of performance trend will just continue, we have seen this since the second crop of 2017,” Hassan said

Since last year, Guyana has been exporting rice to Mexico and according to figures released here, the Caribbean country shipped 113,525 tonnes of paddy in 2017.

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My Glendon Hospital Stay: A Good Experience

My Glendon Hospital Stay: A Good Experience

By Gracelyn Cassell

About a month ago, April 10th to be exact, I ended up at Glendon Hospital for emergency surgery.  I left four days later and friends are astounded when I say that I actually enjoyed the experience.  I’ve had medical issues for years but kept hoping that the new hospital would be in place before things came to a head.  That was not to be.

Glendon Hospital

So there I was on Tuesday evening April 10th, listening to the Nurse on duty in Casualty telephoning the many persons needed for my surgery.  As each person arrived, I quickly apologised for ruining plans for the evening.  I felt particularly bad that Dr. Braimah Kassim, who, after a full day of surgery, would not have the pleasure of a break. Everyone, however, hastened to reassure me that it was okay, it was all part of the job.  Blood had to be drawn for testing, x-rays taken and other unmentionables done in preparation. I discovered that my recent manicure/pedicure would present a problem for monitoring during the operation, so the polish had to be removed.  I must admit that being surrounded by seasoned nurses like Sister Noleen Meade, Nurse Anaesthetist Brenda Daley, and others who prepared me for theatre, actually helped me to relax.    

It is funny how in life we take so much for granted. Sister Icilda Stanley, a former schoolmate, took charge of my personal belongings, and I realise now that I would not have had that level of comfort in an overseas facility.  In fact, immediately after I was back on the ward just before 2 am on Wednesday April 11th, I noticed my bag waiting for me near to what would be my bed for the next several days.  My cell-phone was registering the concern of relatives and friends who needed to know how the operation had gone.

Fortunately, my brother Joseph, the first person I recognised once the anaesthesia wore off, and who I had instructed not to wait around, answered all of the queries. It was really nice to wake up and see him! He explained to me later that I was complaining about being hungry and in pain but I only remember being very calm and collected.  So, it’s good that he was there as a witness to the true state of affairs.  I do remember being offered a cup of bush-tea and that was like music to my ears.  I also received a pain injection and that was it. 

I slept soundly until late afternoon when, my youngest brother, Norman, came and without my knowing, took a photo of me which was sent to the family ‘whatsapp’ group.  They found that photo most reassuring but now seeing Kate Middleton all bright and glowing after giving birth to a third child, I realised that I should have included a make-up kit in my hospital bag!

However, the team that came to check on me the next day didn’t seem worried by my lack of makeup.  They explained what had transpired the night before and seemed happy to see me awake and in good spirits.  I shared a vague recollection that I might have been protesting at some point and they laughingly told me that when I was returned to the ward and placed in bed on my back, I made several attempts to roll on to my side complaining that “I always sleep on my side!”

I was placed on a liquid diet which I actually enjoyed because there were interesting items on the menu like arrowroot porridge which I had not had in years. The plantain porridge reminded me of my student days in Jamaica when I first savoured banana porridge prepared with coconut milk.  In fact, once I was allowed to move to a more solid diet, I actually refused to leave the hospital when Dr. Kassim gave the all clear for me to be discharged on the Friday.  I told him that the menu on Saturday was far too interesting to be missed.  So I went home after supper the following evening.  Little did I know that a hot meal was waiting there for me!

My fears about the post-crisis, makeshift hospital which has no private ward were not realised.  I always felt that noise and light would prevent me from resting but I had the best sleep that I had enjoyed in years and many visitors kept saying that I didn’t look like someone who had undergone surgery.  Once I got home, however, I was thrown off schedule with both rest and medication because I’ve never really liked alarms!  I actually missed having the nurses wake me up when it was time for meds.  And of course, at home, you end up doing all kinds of things which get in the way of sleep or taking meds!

But I can hear you asking – How was this a good experience?  First of all, I am deeply appreciative of all that was done by doctors and staff to facilitate my surgery and make my stay comfortable. They work daily with many challenges. I am impressed that the team includes nutritionists who have incorporated local produce and traditional dishes on the menu.  This assures me that once there is cheaper electricity, if the geothermal project ever comes on stream, there are people who will ensure that the many many seasonal fruits and vegetables that now go to waste, will be put to good use.  I also feel strongly that the proposed hospital plan, developed with the input of this dedicated staff, will be the best for Montserrat. I sincerely hope that someone will dust it off and make the business case for its implementation.  Medical tourism could certainly provide an income stream since I am sure others would love to have my experience.

I was really touched by the many persons near and far, friends and family, who went out of their way to demonstrate their love and caring during my hospital stay and after. I had all kinds of offers: to do my laundry, prepare meals for me, get me fruits, coconut water and jelly, do my shopping and more. This outpouring of support also contributed to my very positive experience.  To be honest, I am trying to resist the temptation to prolong the recovery period.  My sincere thanks to all and kudos to the staff at Glendon! 

Gracelyn Cassell
Head
The University of the West Indies
Open Campus Montserrat

Posted in Columns, Features, General, Health, Letters, Opinions0 Comments

Prime Minister Harris and Police High Command with new recruits from St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Police High Command welcomes new recruits from Grenada & St. Vincent and the Grenadines

BASSETERRE, St. Kitts, May 10Twenty-nine young men from  Grenada and St. Vincent and the Grenadines arrived here on Wednesday  to serve as officers in the Royal St. Christopher and Nevis Police Force (RSCNPF).

This stems from a renewed recruitment drive locally and regionally undertaken by the Service Improvement Directorate to attract individuals with strong academic and technical backgrounds to serve as officers in the Police Force.

Prime Minister Harris and Police High Command with new recruits from St. Vincent and the GrenadinesPrime Minister Dr Timothy Harris, who is also National Security MInister, welcomed the recruits and   thanked them for choosing to serve the people of St. Kitts and Nevis in law enforcement.

“We hope that your experience will be a learning one and a very positive one. Certainly you will learn about other people in the Caribbean; you will learn about St. Kitts and Nevis in particular, and you will learn what it is to be a law enforcement officer.”

Harris told the aspiring police officers that by answering the call to serve they have signaled their intention to uphold the laws of the land and to do what is necessary to safeguard the peace and security for residents, citizens and visitors of St. Kitts and Nevis.

“The police everywhere have a responsibility to serve and protect people, keep our societies safe and, as it were, to help us maintain and minimize elements of crime within our countries, and so we will be counting on you to help make St. Kitts and Nevis the best place in which people can live, people can work, and people can enjoy life,” the National Security Minister said, while assuring the recruits that the St. Kitts and Nevis Government is fully committed to assisting the efforts of the police.

Commissioner of Police, Ian Queeley joined  Harris in thanking the recruits for their interest in serving the people of St. Kitts and Nevis, and stated that, “There are great opportunities to be had serving within this organization and we look forward to engaging you in a very meaningful way so that we can not only contribute to your growth and development, but you will contribute to the growth and development of the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis.”

CMC/kb/2018

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