Categorized | Features, Local, Opinions, Regional

Caribbean Youth Encouraged to Innovate

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The region needs more youth getting involved in technology innovation and digital entrepreneurship. That is the message being delivered to young people attending a special technology camp now underway in Port of Spain, Trinidad.

“The great thing about modern technology is that it gives everyone a real chance to improve their world,” said Kevin Khelawan, Chief Operating Officer at Teleios Systems, one of the largest independent software development firms in the Caribbean.

Khelawan, the first person in the English-speaking Caribbean to receive the Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award, was speaking at the BrightPath Foundation Youth Tech Camp on the theme ‘Identity Powering Technology Innovation’

Teleios is a dominant player in software development and mobile services in the Caribbean and is regarded as one of the region’s most innovative technology firms. Drawing from his experience of building a team of local developers and writing award-winning software at Teleios, Khelawan told the audience that Caribbean young people have the capacity to compete and innovate on the global stage.

“Our youth have a natural affinity for technology, but innovation is much more than simply having a good idea. True innovation involves moving from idea to sustainable solution or product. This requires more than a creative spark,” he said.

He said, “The current education system can put a squeeze on creative expression and innovative thinking. That’s why it is so important to provide opportunities and outlets for our youth to participate in innovation at an early age”.

Khelawan cited several examples of innovation in areas such as fashion, music, software and the design of services started by young people. He also encouraged Caribbean youth to explore opportunities to innovate using technology in the civic domain by creating solutions to help citizens participate in community and nation building.

“To fulfill your potential to innovate, you first need to believe in yourself and believe that your ideas have value. The opportunities for innovation are endless,” he said.

Teleios’ Business Development Manager Lorenzo Hodges, who led participants in an idea-creation exercise at the camp, underscored the importance of creating solutions that address local needs.

Hodges encouraged the participants to, “Pay attention to what’s around you–your community, your city, its needs, what can make it better–opportunities abound…The region can benefit tremendously from innovation that improves people’s lives and develops their local communities.”

The Youth Tech Camp is being hosted by BrightPath Foundation, a Trinidad-based international not-profit organization. The event targets youth between 12 and 15 years old with an interest in business, information technology, graphic design, software programming, web development, mobile apps creation. The audience included youth from the Caribbean, United States and the UK.

 

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The region needs more youth getting involved in technology innovation and digital entrepreneurship. That is the message being delivered to young people attending a special technology camp now underway in Port of Spain, Trinidad.

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“The great thing about modern technology is that it gives everyone a real chance to improve their world,” said Kevin Khelawan, Chief Operating Officer at Teleios Systems, one of the largest independent software development firms in the Caribbean.

Khelawan, the first person in the English-speaking Caribbean to receive the Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award, was speaking at the BrightPath Foundation Youth Tech Camp on the theme ‘Identity Powering Technology Innovation’

Teleios is a dominant player in software development and mobile services in the Caribbean and is regarded as one of the region’s most innovative technology firms. Drawing from his experience of building a team of local developers and writing award-winning software at Teleios, Khelawan told the audience that Caribbean young people have the capacity to compete and innovate on the global stage.

“Our youth have a natural affinity for technology, but innovation is much more than simply having a good idea. True innovation involves moving from idea to sustainable solution or product. This requires more than a creative spark,” he said.

He said, “The current education system can put a squeeze on creative expression and innovative thinking. That’s why it is so important to provide opportunities and outlets for our youth to participate in innovation at an early age”.

Khelawan cited several examples of innovation in areas such as fashion, music, software and the design of services started by young people. He also encouraged Caribbean youth to explore opportunities to innovate using technology in the civic domain by creating solutions to help citizens participate in community and nation building.

“To fulfill your potential to innovate, you first need to believe in yourself and believe that your ideas have value. The opportunities for innovation are endless,” he said.

Teleios’ Business Development Manager Lorenzo Hodges, who led participants in an idea-creation exercise at the camp, underscored the importance of creating solutions that address local needs.

Hodges encouraged the participants to, “Pay attention to what’s around you–your community, your city, its needs, what can make it better–opportunities abound…The region can benefit tremendously from innovation that improves people’s lives and develops their local communities.”

The Youth Tech Camp is being hosted by BrightPath Foundation, a Trinidad-based international not-profit organization. The event targets youth between 12 and 15 years old with an interest in business, information technology, graphic design, software programming, web development, mobile apps creation. The audience included youth from the Caribbean, United States and the UK.