Caribbean Seeks ‘Silver Christmas Lining’ Post-Hurricanes

 
 
Telesur
 
Published 25 December 2017
“It is a rough road, but a road with a lot of heart,” said journalist Alita Singh, from Saint Martin, which was severely battered by hurricanes Irma and Maria earlier this year.

Despite many people in the Caribbean still struggling to rebuild their homes in the wake of devastating recent hurricanes, the Chistmas spirit lives on with communities coming together to celebrate “every development” since September’s storms.

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“Normally by now, you would see businesses giving out turkeys and ham… not this year,” said Gavin Richards, a Dominican broadcaster.

“The shopping trips are definitely down because the money isn’t there… This would have been the peak,” said fellow broadcast journalist Keithstone Greaves, from Anguilla.

“Some folks are trying to get the Christmas feel, but everything is low-key because people are really trying hard to get their lives together.”

After hurricanes Irma and Maria devastated several Caribbean nations, thousands of people were left homeless and unemployed. With finances stretched over reconstruction plans and purchasing bare necessities, traditional Christmas customs have largely had to be abandoned.

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But despite the lack of expansive Christmas dinners and desserts, local businesses are everything they can to bring the holiday spirit to struggling communities, says journalist Alita Singh, insisting that people are instead finding joy in the little things this year.

Brightly lit streets, reliable water sources, food on the shelves: these are just a few of the things the Caribbean is being thankful for this Christmas.

“These days, every development is being celebrated,” said Singh, noting that despite the economic deficit, Christmas trees are experiencing a startling resurrection on Saint Martin, which was hit by Hurricane Irma in early September.

“It is a rough road, but a road with a lot of heart.”

Greaves also hopes for a full recovery, suggesting that the spirit and strength of the Caribbean will help keep the region afloat as it navigates its way through this difficult time.

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Telesur
 
Published 25 December 2017
“It is a rough road, but a road with a lot of heart,” said journalist Alita Singh, from Saint Martin, which was severely battered by hurricanes Irma and Maria earlier this year.

Despite many people in the Caribbean still struggling to rebuild their homes in the wake of devastating recent hurricanes, the Chistmas spirit lives on with communities coming together to celebrate “every development” since September’s storms.

RELATED: Caricom ‘Will Fight EU Over Tax-Haven Blacklist’: LaRocque

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“Normally by now, you would see businesses giving out turkeys and ham… not this year,” said Gavin Richards, a Dominican broadcaster.

“The shopping trips are definitely down because the money isn’t there… This would have been the peak,” said fellow broadcast journalist Keithstone Greaves, from Anguilla.

“Some folks are trying to get the Christmas feel, but everything is low-key because people are really trying hard to get their lives together.”

After hurricanes Irma and Maria devastated several Caribbean nations, thousands of people were left homeless and unemployed. With finances stretched over reconstruction plans and purchasing bare necessities, traditional Christmas customs have largely had to be abandoned.

RELATED:  Economics of Climate Change: Challenges Facing Latin America

But despite the lack of expansive Christmas dinners and desserts, local businesses are everything they can to bring the holiday spirit to struggling communities, says journalist Alita Singh, insisting that people are instead finding joy in the little things this year.

Brightly lit streets, reliable water sources, food on the shelves: these are just a few of the things the Caribbean is being thankful for this Christmas.

“These days, every development is being celebrated,” said Singh, noting that despite the economic deficit, Christmas trees are experiencing a startling resurrection on Saint Martin, which was hit by Hurricane Irma in early September.

“It is a rough road, but a road with a lot of heart.”

Greaves also hopes for a full recovery, suggesting that the spirit and strength of the Caribbean will help keep the region afloat as it navigates its way through this difficult time.