Categorized | International, Local, News

Cardinal Bergoglio is Pope Francis

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina elected pope, takes name Pope Francis

From sources

 

Pope Francis' first greeting

Pope Francis’ first greeting

‘Fruitful mission’

The election of a new Pope was signaled by white smoke from the Sistine Chapel chimney on Wednesday evening.

About an hour later, the name of the new Pope was read out.

He began his address to the crowds by offering a prayer for his predecessor.

In a light-hearted moment, he said his fellow cardinals had gone to the “ends of the Earth” to find a bishop of Rome.

He went on to ask the crowd to “pray to God so that he can bless me”, before calling on the world to set off on a path of love and fraternity.

“Habemus Papam Franciscum,” was the first tweet by the papal account @pontifex since Benedict stood down last month.

The election was met with thunderous applause at the cathedral in Buenos Aires, Pope Francis’ home city.

— The cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church broke Europe’s millennium-long stranglehold on the papacy and astonished the Catholic world Wednesday, electing Jesuit

Cardinal Bergoglio

Cardinal Bergoglio

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina as the 266th pope.

“The duty of the conclave was to appoint a bishop of Rome,” said Bergoglio, 76, who took the name Francis, the first pope in history to do so. “And it seems to me that my brother cardinals went to fetch him at the end of the world. But here I am.”

Bergoglio was believed to have been the runner-up in the 2005 conclave, which yielded Francis’s predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI. Last month, Benedict became the first pope in nearly 600 years to resign.

Shortly after his election, Francis called Benedict, now known as pope emeritus, with whom he will meet in the coming days.

Francis, who will be officially installed in a Mass on Tuesday, is a pope of firsts. He chose a name never before used in the church’s 2,000 -year history, signaling to Vatican analysts that he wants a new beginning for the faith.

“It’s a genius move,” Marco Politi, a papal biographer and veteran Vatican watcher, said of the choice of Bergoglio. “It’s a non-Italian, non-European, not a man of the Roman government. It’s an opening to the Third World, a moderate. By taking the name Francis, it means a completely new beginning.”

“It’s highly significant for what Francis means,” said Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi, referring to Saint Francis of Assisi, who was known for his total vow of poverty. “It means that he is here to serve.”

Lombardi added that after weeks of focus on a Vatican scandal over the leaking of papal letters, and on talk about who exercises power and authority in the church, the selection of the humble Jesuit, who used to take the bus and cook for himself, amounted to a “refusal of power” and “was absolutely radical.”

For many Bergoglio’s hemisphere of origin, home to the largest percentage of Catholics in the world, that was potentially the most important “first” for the future of the church.

“We know how longed-for this was by the Catholics in Latin America,” said Lombardi. “This is a great response to this anticipation.”

That reaction was palpable in St. Peter’s Square as Bergoglio, after being introduced with an announcement of “habemus papam” (we have a pope), walked through crimson curtains and onto the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica to address the crowed, which greeted him with cheers of “Viva il papa!”

Clad in white and surrounded by scarlet-clad cardinals, he looked over a stately book and blessed the faithful below him. Then, in a gesture that many interpreted as a greater embrace of dialogue, he asked the crowd to “pray for me, and we’ll see each other soon.” Finally, with avuncular simplicity, he bid the crowd, “Good night, and have a good rest.”

 

Leave a Reply

TMR print pages

Newsletter

Archives

CARICOM – Staff Vacancy

CXC HEADQUARTERS - Executive Search

https://indd.adobe.com/embed/2b4deb22-cf03-4509-9bbd-938c7e8ecc7d

A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina elected pope, takes name Pope Francis

From sources

 

Pope Francis' first greeting

Pope Francis’ first greeting

Insert Ads Here

‘Fruitful mission’

The election of a new Pope was signaled by white smoke from the Sistine Chapel chimney on Wednesday evening.

About an hour later, the name of the new Pope was read out.

He began his address to the crowds by offering a prayer for his predecessor.

In a light-hearted moment, he said his fellow cardinals had gone to the “ends of the Earth” to find a bishop of Rome.

He went on to ask the crowd to “pray to God so that he can bless me”, before calling on the world to set off on a path of love and fraternity.

“Habemus Papam Franciscum,” was the first tweet by the papal account @pontifex since Benedict stood down last month.

The election was met with thunderous applause at the cathedral in Buenos Aires, Pope Francis’ home city.

— The cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church broke Europe’s millennium-long stranglehold on the papacy and astonished the Catholic world Wednesday, electing Jesuit

Cardinal Bergoglio

Cardinal Bergoglio

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina as the 266th pope.

“The duty of the conclave was to appoint a bishop of Rome,” said Bergoglio, 76, who took the name Francis, the first pope in history to do so. “And it seems to me that my brother cardinals went to fetch him at the end of the world. But here I am.”

Bergoglio was believed to have been the runner-up in the 2005 conclave, which yielded Francis’s predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI. Last month, Benedict became the first pope in nearly 600 years to resign.

Shortly after his election, Francis called Benedict, now known as pope emeritus, with whom he will meet in the coming days.

Francis, who will be officially installed in a Mass on Tuesday, is a pope of firsts. He chose a name never before used in the church’s 2,000 -year history, signaling to Vatican analysts that he wants a new beginning for the faith.

“It’s a genius move,” Marco Politi, a papal biographer and veteran Vatican watcher, said of the choice of Bergoglio. “It’s a non-Italian, non-European, not a man of the Roman government. It’s an opening to the Third World, a moderate. By taking the name Francis, it means a completely new beginning.”

“It’s highly significant for what Francis means,” said Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi, referring to Saint Francis of Assisi, who was known for his total vow of poverty. “It means that he is here to serve.”

Lombardi added that after weeks of focus on a Vatican scandal over the leaking of papal letters, and on talk about who exercises power and authority in the church, the selection of the humble Jesuit, who used to take the bus and cook for himself, amounted to a “refusal of power” and “was absolutely radical.”

For many Bergoglio’s hemisphere of origin, home to the largest percentage of Catholics in the world, that was potentially the most important “first” for the future of the church.

“We know how longed-for this was by the Catholics in Latin America,” said Lombardi. “This is a great response to this anticipation.”

That reaction was palpable in St. Peter’s Square as Bergoglio, after being introduced with an announcement of “habemus papam” (we have a pope), walked through crimson curtains and onto the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica to address the crowed, which greeted him with cheers of “Viva il papa!”

Clad in white and surrounded by scarlet-clad cardinals, he looked over a stately book and blessed the faithful below him. Then, in a gesture that many interpreted as a greater embrace of dialogue, he asked the crowd to “pray for me, and we’ll see each other soon.” Finally, with avuncular simplicity, he bid the crowd, “Good night, and have a good rest.”