Categorized | International, News, Regional

Barbados is getting rid of the Queen as their head of state

Barbados is getting rid of the Queen as their head of stateThe island of Barbados plans to remove Queen Elizabeth II as their head of state in from next November.

The official transition to become a republic is set to coincide with the 50th anniversary of their independence from British rule, reports the Caribbean News Service.

Barbados Prime Minister, Freundel Stuart, told a recent meeting of the ruling Democratic Labour Party: ‘It’s a little awkward in the year 2015 to still have to stand up and instead of pledging allegiance to Barbados to be pledging allegiance to “Her Majesty the Queen”.’

Two other former British colonies in the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago and Dominica, have already deposed (peacefully) the Queen as their monarch.

The Queen will be replaced by a ceremonial President – a spokesperson for Buckingham Palace responded: ‘It is a matter for the government and people of Barbados.’

David Cameron’s spokesperson said he expected this decision would be ‘consistent with self-determination’.

This move needs a constitutional amendment which in turn requires a two-thirds majority in both the Bajan senate and house of assembly.

While the government has a majority in the senate, this is not the case in the lower house. Opposition leader Mia Mottley has not yet commented on this proposed replacement of the Queen.

Prime Minister Stuart insists Barbados will continue to be a member of the Commonwealth regardless of removing Queen Elizabeth as their monarch.

Comments are closed.

TMR print pages

Newsletter

Archives

https://indd.adobe.com/embed/2b4deb22-cf03-4509-9bbd-938c7e8ecc7d

A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

Barbados is getting rid of the Queen as their head of stateThe island of Barbados plans to remove Queen Elizabeth II as their head of state in from next November.

The official transition to become a republic is set to coincide with the 50th anniversary of their independence from British rule, reports the Caribbean News Service.

Barbados Prime Minister, Freundel Stuart, told a recent meeting of the ruling Democratic Labour Party: ‘It’s a little awkward in the year 2015 to still have to stand up and instead of pledging allegiance to Barbados to be pledging allegiance to “Her Majesty the Queen”.’

Insert Ads Here

Two other former British colonies in the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago and Dominica, have already deposed (peacefully) the Queen as their monarch.

The Queen will be replaced by a ceremonial President – a spokesperson for Buckingham Palace responded: ‘It is a matter for the government and people of Barbados.’

David Cameron’s spokesperson said he expected this decision would be ‘consistent with self-determination’.

This move needs a constitutional amendment which in turn requires a two-thirds majority in both the Bajan senate and house of assembly.

While the government has a majority in the senate, this is not the case in the lower house. Opposition leader Mia Mottley has not yet commented on this proposed replacement of the Queen.

Prime Minister Stuart insists Barbados will continue to be a member of the Commonwealth regardless of removing Queen Elizabeth as their monarch.