Categorized | News, Regional

A call for higher age of retirement for judges

By Martina Johnson

Antigua Observer – Former Chief Justice in the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court Sir Brian Alleyne has opined that serious consideration should be given to increasing the retirement age of high court and court of appeal judges.

Sir Brian, who turned 65 four years ago and was succeeded by Chief Justice Hugh Rawlins, said the system should make maximum use of the persons willing and available to serve.

His comments come on the heels of the announcement that Justice Rawlins has resigned effective July 31.

He said the age of retirement for court of appeal judges should be moved up from 65 to 70 or 72. The reason, he said, is the shortage of judicial talent in the region.

“The retirement age for judges at the High Court and Appeal Court in our system, including the chief justice, is too low,” Sir Brian told OBSERVER Radio’s Big Issues yesterday.

“Judicial talent is something that is very scarce and that needs to be exploited, if I can use that word, to the maximum.”

He said currently, the retirement age for high court justices is 60, adding it should increase by five.

“To retire at age 65 for appeal court judge or age 60 for high court judge is below what is ideal and I would have liked to see an increase of the age …” the former adjudicator said.

“In this day and age a man of 65 years is relatively young and energetic and has much to offer still.”

While calling for the age increase however, Sir Brian said the job of chief justice is very demanding and should not be taken lightly.

“It is not easy to find an appropriate person to fill the position of chief justice. It is a very burdensome position,” he noted.

Since the announcement of Justice Rawlins’ resignation, reasons remain unknown.

Several practicing attorneys have lauded his contributions to the judiciary in the region and expressed regret for his sudden, impending departure.

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A Moment with the Registrar of Lands

By Martina Johnson

Antigua Observer – Former Chief Justice in the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court Sir Brian Alleyne has opined that serious consideration should be given to increasing the retirement age of high court and court of appeal judges.

Sir Brian, who turned 65 four years ago and was succeeded by Chief Justice Hugh Rawlins, said the system should make maximum use of the persons willing and available to serve.

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His comments come on the heels of the announcement that Justice Rawlins has resigned effective July 31.

He said the age of retirement for court of appeal judges should be moved up from 65 to 70 or 72. The reason, he said, is the shortage of judicial talent in the region.

“The retirement age for judges at the High Court and Appeal Court in our system, including the chief justice, is too low,” Sir Brian told OBSERVER Radio’s Big Issues yesterday.

“Judicial talent is something that is very scarce and that needs to be exploited, if I can use that word, to the maximum.”

He said currently, the retirement age for high court justices is 60, adding it should increase by five.

“To retire at age 65 for appeal court judge or age 60 for high court judge is below what is ideal and I would have liked to see an increase of the age …” the former adjudicator said.

“In this day and age a man of 65 years is relatively young and energetic and has much to offer still.”

While calling for the age increase however, Sir Brian said the job of chief justice is very demanding and should not be taken lightly.

“It is not easy to find an appropriate person to fill the position of chief justice. It is a very burdensome position,” he noted.

Since the announcement of Justice Rawlins’ resignation, reasons remain unknown.

Several practicing attorneys have lauded his contributions to the judiciary in the region and expressed regret for his sudden, impending departure.